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Supporting Health and Wellness

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Find tips and resources on learning weather limits. Learn more about applying sunscreen and insect repellent, staying hydrated, and playground and water safety. Early care and education programs can share these tips with families.

Tornadoes can happen at any time. However, they are most likely to occur in the spring and summer months. Tornadoes may cause extensive damage to structures and disrupt transportation, power, water, gas, and communications in its direct path and in neighboring areas.

The Virtual Early Education Center (VEEC) is an online tool for early care and education (ECE) programs, including Head Start, Early Head Start, and child care.

Protecting children from exposure to lead is important to lifelong good health. There is no safe level of lead exposure for children. The most important step adults can take is to prevent lead exposure before it occurs.

Find simple recipes for healthy snacks that young children can make in Head Start programs or at home with their families. Recipes appeared in Brush Up on Oral Health issues published between 2012 and 2017.

In the Embracing Health and Wellness series, learn about current research topics, best practices, and safety tips for Head Start and child care programs. Discover tips for supporting staff and engaging families.

Dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common chronic disease in children. Learn how child care health consultants can help early care and education programs apply use strategies and use resources to promote children’s oral health.

After a disaster or crisis, children benefit when adults assure them that they are safe and help them learn how to cope effectively. Use this tip sheet to find out what families and staff can do to help a child after a disaster or crisis.

This guide provides voluntary guidelines that represent the baseline from which all grantees should operate to ensure that children are cared for in healthy and safe environments and that their basic needs are met. This guide was first published in 2000, and was updated in 2005.

Infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and young children who experience a tragic event may show changes in their behaviors. They also may be indirectly affected by a crisis through what they hear or see on TV.