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Stable Financial Assistance to Families

Stable financial assistance necessitates assistance policies that are child focused, family friendly, and fair to providers. Eligibility policies, protection for working parents, and the prioritization of vulnerable children and families promote stable and uninterrupted care for children and families. The following resources provide information about child care supports that promote continuity of care and lasting economic stability for families.

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26 resources found.

This guide provides general information for those beginning to administer or oversee American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) CCDF programs, bringing together the technical and practical aspects of AI/AN CCDF administration. References to specific federal regulations and guidance documents

This fourth webinar in a six-part Hot Topics series supports States and Territories in identifying multiple strategies for building a supply of quality infant and toddler care, specifically in high-need areas.

The Child Care State Capacity Building Center (SCBC) Infant/Toddler Specialist Network is hosting a series of 1-hour Hot Topic Webinars on the 3rd Wednesday of each month beginning on July 19 and running through December 20, 2017.

Approaches to managing wait lists vary. For example, some Lead Agencies complete comprehensive eligibility determinations prior to placing families onto the waiting list.

When the demand for child care assistance is greater than available funds, the State may need to manage enrollment in the child care subsidy program.

This first in a series of Hot Topics webinars examined the requirements in the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 2014 for services to families experiencing or at risk of homelessness. Resources for planning and implementing services for families were shared and discussed.

Young children experiencing homelessness are among the most vulnerable. This brief discusses requirements in the CCDBG Act and CCDF Final Rule regarding homelessness, and explores policy and practice options for Lead Agencies.

This brief highlights key information from the 2012 National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) about the various types of funding that early care and education (ECE) centers receive.

The National Survey of Early Care and Education reached 12,000 families and large numbers of home-based and center-based programs (6,000 home-based providers, 5,600 classroom staff, and 8,200 program directors).

This brief describes findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) about how families make these types of decisions.

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