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Safety and Injury Prevention

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Explore this tool for ways to develop new or build upon existing health and safety trainings. Find up-to-date research- and science-informed resources and practices. It can be used by:

Find tips and resources on learning weather limits. Learn more about applying sunscreen and insect repellent, staying hydrated, and playground and water safety. Early care and education programs can share these tips with families.

The Virtual Early Education Center (VEEC) is an online tool for early care and education (ECE) programs, including Head Start, Early Head Start, and child care.

In the Embracing Health and Wellness series, learn about current research topics, best practices, and safety tips for Head Start and child care programs. Discover tips for supporting staff and engaging families.

After a disaster or crisis, children benefit when adults assure them that they are safe and help them learn how to cope effectively. Use this tip sheet to find out what families and staff can do to help a child after a disaster or crisis.

Certain triggers, such as persistent infant crying, may lead some caregivers who are highly stressed to shake young infants. This can result in abusive head trauma that damages a baby's brain. Find out ways to strengthen protective factors that can help keep children safe.

Dr. Rachel Moon, an expert on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), presents the updated 2016 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Task Force recommendations that relate to safe sleep practices in early childhood education (ECE) programs.

Dr. Marilyn Bull, pediatrician and national expert on child passenger safety, discusses how to keep children safe in motor vehicles. Learn how your program can use the car seat flip charts to help families:

Certain triggers, such as persistent infant crying, may lead some caregivers who are highly stressed to shake young infants. This can result in abusive head trauma that damages a baby's brain. Find out ways to strengthen protective factors that can help keep children safe.

During the first five years, children constantly acquire new skills and knowledge. Caregivers who know what children can do and how they can get hurt can protect them from injury.1