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Equal Access to Child Care

Equal access to child care entails identifying, evaluating, and promoting policies that support accessible, high-quality care for all populations. Such policies can include those that address assessing market rates and child care costs, strategies for building supply, setting payment rates, establishing payment practices, and ensuring parental choice. The following resources provide further information about these topics as they relate to equal access to care.

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This 2-pager provides key information about NCASE and details NCASE supports and services, organized in the areas of resource development and management, provision of training and technical assistance, and training and technical assistance coordination and collaboration.

This guide provides general information for those beginning to administer or oversee American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) CCDF programs, bringing together the technical and practical aspects of AI/AN CCDF administration. References to specific federal regulations and guidance documents

This fourth webinar in a six-part Hot Topics series supports States and Territories in identifying multiple strategies for building a supply of quality infant and toddler care, specifically in high-need areas.

Lead Agencies can use direct service grants or contracts to increase the supply of quality child care for underserved or vulnerable populations. This brief provides information on direct service grants and contracts, including:

The Roadmap to Reauthorization Self-Assessment and Implementation Planning Tool was released as part of the 2017 Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Final Rule Cluster Trainings for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) CCDF grantees.  The tool was designed to provide AI/AN C

This first in a series of Hot Topics webinars examined the requirements in the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 2014 for services to families experiencing or at risk of homelessness. Resources for planning and implementing services for families were shared and discussed.

The CCDBG Act requires Lead Agencies to certify that rates are sufficient to ensure eligible children have equal access to child care services comparable to those in State or local sub-markets provided to children who are not eligible to receive CCDF or other Federal or State child care...

One of the goals of the Child Care Development Fund is to increase access to high-quality child care for children in families of low income.

Having adequate, and even inspiring facilities for center-based early care and education facilities is a goal for all leaders.

This brief identifies subsidy policy issues and State examples that Child Care Development Fund administrators can consider to address school-age care needs. This is the third brief in a three-part series on school-age quality.

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