State and Territory Profile

STATE/TERRITORY PROFILE - WASHINGTON

This profile highlights a current innovative effort to promote a subsidy system that is child-focused, family friendly, and fair to providers. It also provides demographic information, Early Care and Education (ECE) program participation and funding, subsidy innovation and program integrity information, program quality improvement activities, and professional development and workforce initiatives. Sources and links are provided at the end of the document

Demographics

Total Population 12 and Under
Total Population 12 and Under. Under 3-Years Old: Total 264022, Percentage 23; 3 and 4-Years Old: Total 175635 Percentage 16; 5 through 12-Years Old: Total 693129 Percentage 61
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (n.d.). In American Community Survey, 2010. QT-P2 Single Years of Age and Sex. Retrieved from American FactFinder: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_SF1_QTP2&prodType=table
Children Living in Working Families
Children Living in Working Families: Children under 6-Years-Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.226913254642051 and with two working parents 0.407282490556286; Children Ages 6 to 17-Years Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.25161134842929 and with two working parents 0.456706233697501
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. B17024: Age By Ratio Of Income To Poverty Level In The Past 12 Months - Universe: Population for whom poverty status is determined. https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=B17024&g=0100000US.04000.001&hidePreview=true&table=B17024&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.B17024&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019&mode=&y=2019
Poverty Statistics
Poverty Statistics: 0.298893182068839 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.129810433361934 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty; 0.267391151662974 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.115912430597299 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty
  Below 100% of Poverty Below 185% of Poverty
Under 6-Years Old 12.98% 29.89%
6 to 17-Years Old 11.59% 26.74%
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. C23008 Age of own Children under 18 Years in Families and Subfamilies by Living Arrangements by Employment Status of Parents: Universe: Own children under 18 years in families and subfamilies.
https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=C23008&g=&hidePreview=false&table=C23008&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.C23008&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019

ECE Program Participation and Funding

Percentage and Number of Children/Families Served
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage
of Children in Care By Age Group
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage<br>of Children in Care By Age Group. Under 3-Years Old: 26%; 3 and 4-Years Old: 26%; 5 through 12-Years Old: 47%
CCDF Average Monthly Number
of Children and Families Served
Average Monthly number of Children and Families Served: Children 34000 and Families 19800
Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 9 Average Monthly Percentages of Children In Care By Age Group https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-9
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates].Table 1 Average Monthly Adjusted Number of Families and Children Served.
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-1
  • Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care
    Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Licensed or Regulated Providers: Center 40%, Group Home 0%, Family Home 19%, Child's Home 19%
    Non-Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Legally Operating Without Regulations: Center 0%, Group Home 0%, Family Home 0%, Child's Home 0%
    Note: Unregulated provider data includes relative and non-relative care.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 6 Average Monthly
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-6
    Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)
    • Total CCDF Expenditure (Including Quality):
    $237,233,316
    • CCDF Federal Expenditure:
    $179,954,025
    • CCDF State/Territory Expenditure:
    $57,279,291
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2021). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2019 (all appropriation years). Table 4a: All expenditures by State- Categorical Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-4a

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2020). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2018 (all appropriation years). Table 3a - All Expenditures by State – Detailed Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-3a
    CCDF Quality Expenditures
    • Total Quality Expenditure:
    $23,929,731
    • Quality Activities (Set Aside Funds):
    $23,929,731
    • Infant and Toddler (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    • Quality Expansion Funds (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    • School-Age/Resource and Referral (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for Child Care
    • TANF – Total Child Care Expenditure:
    $128,149,997
    Bullet icon TANF – Direct Expenditure on Child Care: $63,909,249
    Bullet icon TANF – Transfer to CCDF: $64,240,748
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance. (2020). Fiscal Year 2019 TANF Financial Data. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ofa/resource/tanf-financial-data-fy-2019
    ChildCare Tax Credits
    • Tax Credit Federal Total Amount Claimed:
    $2,112,729
    • Tax Credit Federal Number of Claims:
    915,860
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Available - 2015:
    No
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Refundable:
    No
    Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)
    • CACFP Funding:
    $44,711,188
    • Number of Family Child Care Homes Participating:
    1,398
    • Number of Child Care Centers (includes Head Start Programs) Participating:
    1,354
    Source(s): Food Research and Action Center. (2020). State of the States: Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) in FY 2019. http://www.frac.org/maps/sos/tables/sos_tab_cacfp.html
    Head Start
    • Head Start Federal Allocation:
    $168,770,936
    • Head Start State/Territory Allocation:
    Not available
    • Number of Children Participating:
    10,856
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2021). The 2020 state of preschool yearbook. http://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/2020
    IDEA Part B, Section 619
    • IDEA Part B Funding:
    $8,433,118
    • Number of Children Served (Ages 3- through 5-Years-Old):
    18,256
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    IDEA Part C
    • IDEA Part C Funding:
    $10,584,988
    • Number of Children Served (Ages Birth through 2-Years-Old):
    10,002
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    Pre-kindergarten
    • Pre-kindergarten Total Expenditure:
    $132,197,514
    • Enrollment (4-year-olds and under):
    14,000
    Note: Total Expenditure includes all State/Territory, Local, and Federal dollars. In addition to 3 and 4-year-olds, some Pre-kindergarten programs enroll children of other ages.
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2021). The 2020 state of preschool yearbook. https://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/yearbook2020

    CCDF Subsidy Program Administration

    Family Percentile Recent MRS
    Income Eligibility at Determination
    (a) (b) (c) (d)
    Family Size100 % of SMI ($/Month) 85% of SMI($/Month)
    [Multiply(a) by 0.85]
    (IF APPLICABLE) ($/Month) Maximum Initial or First Tier Income Limit (or Threshold) if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI IF APPLICABLE) (% of SMI) [Divide(c) by (a), multiply by 100] Income Level if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI
    3 $6,164.00 $5,239.00 $3,464.00 56%
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.1.3 Family Size of 3: Eligible Children and Families - Income Eligibility at Determination. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care
    • Coordinating with Head Start, prekindergarten, or other early learning programs to create a package of arrangements that accommodates parents’ work schedules
    Yes
    • Inquiring about whether the child has an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Individual Family Services Plan (IFSP)
    Not available
    • Establishing minimum eligibility periods greater than 12 months
    Not available
    • Using cross-enrollment or referrals to other public benefits
    Yes
    • Working with IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C staff to explore how services included in a child’s IEP or IFSP can be supported and/or provided onsite and in collaboration with child care services
    Not available
    • Providing more intensive case management for families with children with multiple risk factors;
    Yes
    • Implementing policies and procedures that promote universal design to ensure that activities and environments are accessible to all children, including children with sensory, physical, or other disabilities
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Early Head Start–Child Care Partnership (EHS-CCP) grants allow Early Head Start programs to partner with local child care centers and family child care providers to increase comprehensive, high quality early learning opportunities to infants and toddlers from low-income families. Funds provide resources to support the delivery of comprehensive services, including enhanced quality learning environments that benefit all children and families sharing the child care setting. Other children who are also enrolled in classrooms with EHS-CCP children benefit from the enhanced services and supports that are made available to child care partners through this grant. These services focus on continuity of care, full-day, full year service, and have strict programmatic oversight to ensure that EHS funds supplement, but do not supplant, other funding methods. Further, all children that are eligible for subsidized child care qualify for 12 months of eligibility to support continuity of care. DCYF partners with OSPI, DOH, DSHS, and Thrive Washington to coordinate early learning activities between the five entities. This partnership meets monthly to discuss current projects within early learning and transition services for children. The goal of this partnership is to move toward a seamless system of services for children birth to age eight, and improve supports to child care providers. DCYF also coordinates services with Head Start, ECEAP (state pre-K) and other preschool programs such as the City of Seattle Preschool Initiative. In order to better coordinate services, DCYF has a Memorandum of Understanding with the City of Seattle which outlines specific agreements and services between ECEAP and the Preschool Initiative. At the statewide level DCYF is moving toward serving all income eligible 4 year old children who are not in Head Start by 2020.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.1.6 and 3.1.6-2: Eligible Children and Families - Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families
    Children with Special Needs
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    In addition to the base rate for licensed care, DSHS will authorize additional special needs daily rates based on child age and geographic region.
    Families with Very Low Incomes
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Not available
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    “Families with very low incomes” means families enrolled in TANF. When a wait list is required, these families are given priority. See WAC 110-15-2210.
    Children Experiencing Homelessness
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Families experiencing homelessness have four months to move into and verify participation in approved activities, and to resolve any outstanding copayment issues. DSHS authorizes the family for full-time care, and the family's copayment is waived during the four-month period. If at any point during the period the family verifies participation in approved activities, the family will qualify to receive the rest of their 12 months of eligibility. See WAC 110-15-0023.

    DCYF coordinates services to homeless families available under these programs through regular inter- and cross-divisional planning and collaboration. DCYF's ongoing goals for this coordination are to expand capacity to assist families in crisis and to expand access to quality full-day, full-year programs with comprehensive services under WCCC, SCC, ECEAP, Head Start and Early Head Start. DCYF prioritizes homeless families for services under all these programs and continues to explore layered funding strategies through ECEAP expansion and Early Head Start - Child Care Partnerships to improve access to quality comprehensive services for this vulnerable population.

    In addition, DCYF contracts with CCA, who assists families experiencing homelessness to navigate the DSHS eligibility determination under the rules described above. CCA, using a separate statewide phone line, provides these families expert guidance on eligibility rules affecting them. CCA works with DCYF and DSHS when it identifies eligibility barriers for these families in policy or service delivery. As a result, families experiencing homelessness are given tools to provide DSHS the information needed to determine eligibility based on their true circumstances.
    Families Receiving TANF*
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Not available
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Not available
    Not available
    * Includes families receiving TANF program funds, those transitioning off TANF through work activities, or those at risk of becoming dependent on TANF.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.2.2a, 3.2.2b, 3.2.2c, 3.2.2d, 3.2.2a-2, 3.2.2b-2, 3.2.2c-2, and 3.2.2d-2: Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Supply of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Yes
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Not available
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Not available
    • Other:
    Not available
    Not available
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Quality of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Yes
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Not available
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Not available
    • Other:
    Not available
    Not available
    Base payment rates and percentiles
    Age Center Percentile of most recent MRS Family Child Care Percentile of most recent MRS
    Infant $ 54.00/ day 10th $ 55.46/ day 50th
    Toddler $ 45.08/ day 10th $ 46.22/ day 30th
    Preschool $ 37.84/ day 10th $ 41.60/ day 30th
    School Age $ 34.08/ day 60th $ 32.96/ day 50th
    Effective date of payment rates: July 1, 2017 for licensed family homes; September 1, 2017 for licensed centers.
    Market rate survey (MRS) date: 7/26/2018
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.3.1: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.2.5a: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Tiered Reimbursement or Differential Rates
    • Differential rate for non-traditional hours. Describe
    Yes
    • Differential rate for children with special needs, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Differential rate for infants and toddlers. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for infants/toddlers with no separate bonus or add-on
    Not available
    • Differential rate for school-age programs. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for school-age children with no separate bonus or add-on.
    Not available
    • Differential rate for higher quality, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Other differential rates or tiered rates.
    Yes
    • Tiered or differential rates are not implemented.
    Not available
    CCDF Co-Payemts by Family Size
    CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size
    (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f)
    Family Size Lowest “Entry” Income Level Where Family Is First Charged Co-Pay (Greater Than $0) What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (a)? The Co-Payment in Column (b) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (a)? Highest “Entry” Income Level Before a Family Is No Longer Eligible What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (d)? The Co-Payment in Column (e) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (d)?
    3 $1.00 $15.00 1500 $3,464.00 $606.00 17
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.1a Family Size of 3: Family Contribution to Payment - CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Family Contribution to Payment
    • No, the Lead Agency does not waive family contributions/co-payments.
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families with an income at or below the Federal poverty level for families of the same size.
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services, as determined by the Lead Agency for purposes of CCDF eligibility. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation..
    Yes
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services
    Families experiencing homeless may qualify for the HGP, under which the family contribution is waived.
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for other criteria established by the Lead Agency. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation
    Not available
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for other criteria (See table below)
    Not available
    Not available
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.4: Family Contribution to Payment - Family Contribution to Payment. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Health and Safety

    Child-Staff Ratios by Group Size by Age of Children for Licensed Child Care Centers
    Age of Children Child-Staff Ratio Group Size
    Infant (11 months) 4:1 8
    Toddler (35 months) 7:1 14
    Preschool (59months) 10:1 20
    School-age (6 years) 15:1 30
    School-age (10 years and older) 15:1 30
    If any of the responses above are different for exempt child care centers, describe which requirements apply: Described Below
    Outdoor, nature-based early learning and child care programs (“outdoor preschools”) are exempt from licensing, pursuant to RCW 43.216.010(2) but operate most similarly to center-based child care. Outdoor preschools participating in the pilot project comply with the following standards: Outdoor preschools define “school age” as children 30 months through 6 years of age and not attending kindergarten or elementary school. Outdoor preschools have a maximum ratio of 1:6 or smaller, e.g. 1:1 when using camp stoves or engaging with campfires. The maximum group size for outdoor preschools is 16 children. Outdoor preschool Lead Teachers are required to meet the qualifications listed above plus education and training in environmental education, which may include wilderness skills or nature-based early education.

    Programs on Tribal land that are Certified for Payment Only are not subject to group size or ratio requirements and instead follow their processes documented in their CCDF Plans. Programs within Military jurisdictions follow requirements as specified by the Department of Defense.
    Source(s): National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance. (2021). 2020 Child Care Licensing Study: Analysis of child care licensing regulations. [Unpublished data].

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 5.2.1a-5_6_7: Standards on ratios, group sizes, and qualifications for CCDF providers.– exempt child care centers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Quality Improvement

    Use of Quality Funds
    Yes/No CCDF Funds Other Funds Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services Yes Yes Yes General fund-state dollars.
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Supporting accreditation Not available Not available Not available Not available
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Use of Quality Funds - Continued
    Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce General fund-state dollars.
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines General fund-state dollars.
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system General fund-state dollars.
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers General fund-state dollars.
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards General fund-state dollars.
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys General fund-state dollars.
    Supporting accreditation Not available
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development General fund-state dollars.
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible General fund-state dollars.
    Source(s):
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-1: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-2: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-3: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-4: Use of Quality Funds - Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-5: Use of Quality Funds - Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-6: Use of Quality Funds - Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-7: Use of Quality Funds - Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territory. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-8: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting accreditation. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-9: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-10: Use of Quality Funds - Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency
    Application in other languages (application document, brochures, provider notices) Yes
    Informational materials in non-English languages Yes
    Website in non-English languages Yes
    Lead Agency accepts applications at local community-based locations Yes
    Bilingual caseworkers or translators available Yes
    Bilingual outreach workers Yes
    Partnerships with community-based organizations Yes
    Other Yes
    Describe Other Described Below
    CCA’s website is available in English and Spanish, with an option at the top of every page to see content displayed in either language. CCA, DCYF and DSHS also utilize translation agencies as needed when working with families and providers, and some staff are bilingual and able to better assist individuals for whom English is not their first language. DCYF and DSHS policy and procedure requires staff serving clients to identify limited English proficient (LEP) clients as early as possible during initial contact, identify primary language spoken, inform clients of their right to language services at no cost, and to then arrange effective language services. DCYF and DSHS require staff, when communicating in writing with LEP clients, to determine the most effective method for communicating, which, depending on circumstances may require full translation of written communications, a translated summary of written communications, a letter telling the client how to contact DCYF or DSHS for assistance in understanding the communication, or an oral interpretation of the communication. These provisions are in effect during DCYF and DSHS operating hours. In implementing these policies, DCYF and DSHS takes into account linguistic needs of clients served to promote equitable access to services.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.1-1 and 2.1.1-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families for whom English is not their first language. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with a Person(s) with Disabilities
    Applications and public informational materials available in Braille and other communication formats for access by individuals with disabilities Not available
    Websites that are accessible (e.g., Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act) Yes
    Caseworkers with specialized training/experience in working with individuals with disabilities Not available
    Ensuring accessibility of environments and activities for all children Yes
    Partnerships with state and local programs and associations focused on disability-related topics and issues Not available
    Partnerships with parent associations, support groups, and parent-to-parent support groups, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) federally funded Parent Training and Information Centers Not available
    Partnerships with state and local IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C providers and agencies Yes
    Availability and/or access to specialized services (e.g., mental health, behavioral specialists, therapists) to address the needs of all children Yes
    Other Yes
    Describe Other Described Below
    DCYF provides information to families about services for children via our website: https://www.dcyf.wa.gov/services/child-development-supports/esit#nolink. We also partner with a number of community organizations, listed on that webpage, to ensure eligible families and families who have concerns about their child’s development have access to the resources they need.

    DCYF contracts with the Washington State Department of Health to place materials in their Child Profile Health Promotion System. These materials, titled Watch & Help Me Grow, are sent to parents at three developmental periods in the child’s growth: 3 months old, 6 months, and 12 months. These brochures raise parental awareness about early childhood development and signals of potential developmental delays, provide resource for parents to receive a free developmental screening, if needed, and connect parents to get a free developmental screening, if needed. They are printed in English and Spanish.

    DCYF delegates responsibility for Child Find and some outreach services at the local level to our Local Lead Agencies. DCYF also provides materials to these LLAs for engaging and educating families. DCYF also partners with WithinReach, and non-profit state-wide organization that helps families navigate the health and social services systems through a hotline, website, and materials distribution. Families can connect with WithinReach to find services for children with disabilities.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.2-1 and 2.1.2-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families with a person(s) with a disability. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Consumer Education Website
    How the Lead Agency ensures that its website is consumer-friendly and easily accessible DCYF is a newly formed agency with a new website launched July 1, 2018. As we continue reviewing, developing, and amending the content for this new website, we are actively using the principles of the World Wide Web Consortium’s recommendations around readability, keeping language at a secondary reading level, minimizing where feasible the use of technical terms and acronyms. Further, we adhere to the Associated Press Styleguide, which helps ensure consistency and readability across mediums.

    DCYF uses the Drupal content management system to create and manage the website. Drupal provides accessibility features to make it easy for content managers and Web developers to adhere to accessibility guidelines. Drupal has made a committment to ensuring that all features of Drupal core conform with the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) guidelines: WCAG 2.0 and ATAG 2.0. In addition, the site was developed using responsive design so the content can be viewed in an optimal way regardless of the screen size it’s being viewed on.

    Further, DCYF makes the site consumer-friendly by working with our content experts and the site end-users to understand the information clients, service providers, and other users access on our site in order to design the structure to best meet their needs. DCYF will conduct usability studies throughout the development of the site to identify issues. Google analytics will also help identify most popular search terms people are entering to ensure the language we’re using is correct, track our highest hit pages, and provide insight to help us better understand our users so we can adjust our design accordingly.

    In addition, with the development of our new online child care resources, our partner CCA is using the same web base for more seamless integration with DCYF’s Child Care Check system.
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for families that speak languages other than English DCYF's site displays prominently at the top left of every page a link to Google Translate. Clicking the link displays over 100 languages the user can select to translate site text into. Further, forms that our customers need to fill out are available on the website in languages identified by census and other data collection as prominent in communities we serve, and customers can request translation of any document into any language. However, an English speaking person may need to help non-English speaking consumers navigate the website to find the forms. Key pieces of written outreach materials are currently translated into languages most commonly spoken by the intended audiences, as are training materials for service providers. We provide telephone interpretation services for consumers, and this resources is prominently displayed on the DCYF website.
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for persons with disabilities DCYF is committed to providing information and services that are accessible to people with disabilities. We provide reasonable accommodations, and strive to make all of our programs accessible to all persons, regardless of ability, in accordance with all relevant state and federal laws. The DCYF website is fully compliant with Washington State’s Office of the Chief Information Officer’s policy on accessiblity, which states “[t]his policy establishes the expectation for state agencies that people with disabilities have access to and use of information and data and be provided access to the same services and content that is available to persons without disabilities unless providing direct access is not possible due to technical or legal limitations.” https://docs.google.com/viewerng/viewer?url=https://ocio.wa.gov/sites/default/files/public/policies/188_Accessibility_Interim_TSB_Approved_20170912.pdf.

    Further, the new DCYF website is built in Drupal, which provides accessibility features that make it easy for content managers and Web developers to adhere to accessibility guidelines. Some of these features include search engine form and presentation, drag and drop functionality, and the way webpages present color contrast and intensity. Read more about their policies and features here: https://www.drupal.org/about/features/accessibility.

    During design and construction of the website, we used state-owned computer testing labs to verify the site’s compatibility with the most common screen reader tool for people with visual impairments. For ongoing maintenance, DCYF uses a web-based tool that routinely scans our website for errors, including website accessibility issues.
    Other features that we use to ensure optimal use of the site for persons with disabilities include:

    - Closed captioning videos
    - Text alternatives for non-text content
    - Using labels and not just color to communicate
    - Including TTY phone numbers where available
    - Alternative ways of contacting a person (voice, email)
    - Navigating forms and website with keyboard equivalents
    - Drupal supports the proper use of semantic markup for people who rely on a screen reader or other assistive technologies.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.3.1, 2.3.1, and 2.3.3: Consumer Education Website. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

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