State and Territory Profile

STATE/TERRITORY PROFILE - NEW YORK

This profile highlights a current innovative effort to promote a subsidy system that is child-focused, family friendly, and fair to providers. It also provides demographic information, Early Care and Education (ECE) program participation and funding, subsidy innovation and program integrity information, program quality improvement activities, and professional development and workforce initiatives. Sources and links are provided at the end of the document

Demographics

Total Population 12 and Under
Total Population 12 and Under. Under 3-Years Old: Total 693268, Percentage 23; 3 and 4-Years Old: Total 462554 Percentage 15; 5 through 12-Years Old: Total 1881574 Percentage 62
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (n.d.). In American Community Survey, 2010. QT-P2 Single Years of Age and Sex. Retrieved from American FactFinder: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_SF1_QTP2&prodType=table
Children Living in Working Families
Children Living in Working Families: Children under 6-Years-Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.261747205999896 and with two working parents 0.427158921563855; Children Ages 6 to 17-Years Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.281563792959198 and with two working parents 0.430730537239593
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. B17024: Age By Ratio Of Income To Poverty Level In The Past 12 Months - Universe: Population for whom poverty status is determined. https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=B17024&g=0100000US.04000.001&hidePreview=true&table=B17024&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.B17024&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019&mode=&y=2019
Poverty Statistics
Poverty Statistics: 0.336843489839135 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.188171567424619 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty; 0.338481125459787 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.177715071284878 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty
  Below 100% of Poverty Below 185% of Poverty
Under 6-Years Old 18.82% 33.68%
6 to 17-Years Old 17.77% 33.85%
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. C23008 Age of own Children under 18 Years in Families and Subfamilies by Living Arrangements by Employment Status of Parents: Universe: Own children under 18 years in families and subfamilies.
https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=C23008&g=&hidePreview=false&table=C23008&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.C23008&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019

ECE Program Participation and Funding

Percentage and Number of Children/Families Served
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage
of Children in Care By Age Group
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage<br>of Children in Care By Age Group. Under 3-Years Old: 28%; 3 and 4-Years Old: 26%; 5 through 12-Years Old: 46%
CCDF Average Monthly Number
of Children and Families Served
Average Monthly number of Children and Families Served: Children 89400 and Families 52700
Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 9 Average Monthly Percentages of Children In Care By Age Group https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-9
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates].Table 1 Average Monthly Adjusted Number of Families and Children Served.
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-1
  • Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care
    Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Licensed or Regulated Providers: Center 34%, Group Home 34%, Family Home 5%, Child's Home 5%
    Non-Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Legally Operating Without Regulations: Center 8%, Group Home 0%, Family Home 7%, Child's Home 7%
    Note: Unregulated provider data includes relative and non-relative care.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 6 Average Monthly
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-6
    Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)
    • Total CCDF Expenditure (Including Quality):
    $894,908,093
    • CCDF Federal Expenditure:
    $692,772,944
    • CCDF State/Territory Expenditure:
    $202,135,149
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2021). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2019 (all appropriation years). Table 4a: All expenditures by State- Categorical Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-4a

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2020). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2018 (all appropriation years). Table 3a - All Expenditures by State – Detailed Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-3a
    CCDF Quality Expenditures
    • Total Quality Expenditure:
    $106,826,955
    • Quality Activities (Set Aside Funds):
    $106,826,955
    • Infant and Toddler (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    • Quality Expansion Funds (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    • School-Age/Resource and Referral (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for Child Care
    • TANF – Total Child Care Expenditure:
    $365,827,587
    Bullet icon TANF – Direct Expenditure on Child Care: $149
    Bullet icon TANF – Transfer to CCDF: $365,827,438
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance. (2020). Fiscal Year 2019 TANF Financial Data. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ofa/resource/tanf-financial-data-fy-2019
    ChildCare Tax Credits
    • Tax Credit Federal Total Amount Claimed:
    $4,387,849
    • Tax Credit Federal Number of Claims:
    2,254,110
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Available - 2015:
    Yes
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Refundable:
    Yes
    Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)
    • CACFP Funding:
    $230,630,469
    • Number of Family Child Care Homes Participating:
    8,296
    • Number of Child Care Centers (includes Head Start Programs) Participating:
    4,036
    Source(s): Food Research and Action Center. (2020). State of the States: Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) in FY 2019. http://www.frac.org/maps/sos/tables/sos_tab_cacfp.html
    Head Start
    • Head Start Federal Allocation:
    $443,557,376
    • Head Start State/Territory Allocation:
    Not available
    • Number of Children Participating:
    36,864
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2021). The 2020 state of preschool yearbook. http://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/2020
    IDEA Part B, Section 619
    • IDEA Part B Funding:
    $34,840,681
    • Number of Children Served (Ages 3- through 5-Years-Old):
    75,084
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    IDEA Part C
    • IDEA Part C Funding:
    $26,271,804
    • Number of Children Served (Ages Birth through 2-Years-Old):
    31,152
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    Pre-kindergarten
    • Pre-kindergarten Total Expenditure:
    $834,243,200
    • Enrollment (4-year-olds and under):
    120,139
    Note: Total Expenditure includes all State/Territory, Local, and Federal dollars. In addition to 3 and 4-year-olds, some Pre-kindergarten programs enroll children of other ages.
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2021). The 2020 state of preschool yearbook. https://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/yearbook2020

    CCDF Subsidy Program Administration

    Family Percentile Recent MRS
    Income Eligibility at Determination
    (a) (b) (c) (d)
    Family Size100 % of SMI ($/Month) 85% of SMI($/Month)
    [Multiply(a) by 0.85]
    (IF APPLICABLE) ($/Month) Maximum Initial or First Tier Income Limit (or Threshold) if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI IF APPLICABLE) (% of SMI) [Divide(c) by (a), multiply by 100] Income Level if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI
    3 $6,240.00 $5,304.00 $3,463.00 56%
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.1.3 Family Size of 3: Eligible Children and Families - Income Eligibility at Determination. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care
    • Coordinating with Head Start, prekindergarten, or other early learning programs to create a package of arrangements that accommodates parents’ work schedules
    Not available
    • Inquiring about whether the child has an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Individual Family Services Plan (IFSP)
    Not available
    • Establishing minimum eligibility periods greater than 12 months
    Not available
    • Using cross-enrollment or referrals to other public benefits
    Not available
    • Working with IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C staff to explore how services included in a child’s IEP or IFSP can be supported and/or provided onsite and in collaboration with child care services
    Not available
    • Providing more intensive case management for families with children with multiple risk factors;
    Not available
    • Implementing policies and procedures that promote universal design to ensure that activities and environments are accessible to all children, including children with sensory, physical, or other disabilities
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    OCFS has multiple policies and practices that promote children’s learning and development as well as continuity of care, and the approaches listed above are utilized based on local practices given the nature of New York’s State supervised county administered structure. On a statewide level, each child’s individual needs are considered during the eligibility determination process;  the OCFS form OCFS-6025, “Application for Child Care Assistance” specifically asks if each child listed on the case has a disability, and child care arrangements selected by families and approved by the LDSS often include the application of approaches which: • coordinate with Head Start, prekindergarten, or other early learning programs, • provide for integration of Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Individual Family Services Plan (IFSP) requirements,• refer families to other public benefits when appropriate, • support services for children as required under IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C, • promote the integration of all children, regardless of disability into child care settings. Examples of how these approaches are supported by OCFS for implementation on the county level are as follows:  In accordance with IDEA Part C, the NYS Early Intervention Program (EIP) has a child find system component; the goal of which is that eligible infants and toddlers in the state are identified, located, referred to the EIP, and receive a multidisciplinary evaluation; including coordination with other state agencies responsible for administering the various education, health, and social service programs, including child care programs. Regulations at 10 NYCRR Section 69-4.3 include child care programs and LDSSs as primary referral sources for the EIP. As primary referral sources, licensed and registered child care programs are required to refer infants and toddlers suspected of having a disability (which is defined to include developmental delay) and children at risk of having a developmental disability to the local Early Intervention Official. Children suspected of having a disability receive a multidisciplinary evaluation, which may include a developmental screening, with parent consent, to determine eligibility for EIP services. Children at risk of having a disability receive screening and tracking services through the local Early Intervention Program. The Council on Children and Families (the Council), which serves to coordinate the state health, education and human services agencies, is housed with the Lead Agency and, as such, works very closely with the Division of Child Care Services. The Council, through the Early Childhood Advisory Council (ECAC), has developed early learning guidelines for children birth through age 5. The New York State Education Department (SED) has developed early learning standards for what children should be able to know and do by the end of their pre-school experience, upon entering kindergarten. The Early Learning Guidelines developed by the ECAC's Workforce Development Work Group were formally released to the field in April 2012. They have been aligned with the State Education Department's Pre-Kindergarten Standards. At least 10 percent of state-funded Pre-K in New York State must be in community-based programs, such as child care centers. This creates a natural incentive for both OCFS, which regulates child care centers, and the State Education Department, which administers the Pre-K programs, to work together to support each other's programming. So, for example, OCFS collaborated with the State Education Department to adopt an approach that gives credit points in grants for Pre-K services to programs offering wrap-around programming to Pre-K students, and thus more continuity of care. To reinforce their partnership, OCFS and the State Education Department hold monthly conference calls. The agenda includes issues shared between both agencies as they affect pre-school programs.The New York City Administration for Children's Services (ACS), EarlyLearn NYC program was designed to better integrate Head Start and other child care programs provided through contracts with the city into a standardized and improved system for providing subsidized care. This includes expanding services in communities that are defined as having the greatest need, as well as increasing child care slots for infants and toddlers. Home-based providers serve the youngest children in the EarlyLearn NYC model. Rather than contract with individual family child care and group family child care providers, ACS contracts with family child care networks. These networks recruit, oversee, and provide administrative oversight and support, and eligibility determination to family-based providers. In an effort to build continuity of care and provide families with a smooth transition when their child ages out of the family child care setting, each network is expected to link with a child care center. OCFS is committed to providing support so that families can obtain appropriate, flexible child care to meet their needs. When needed, families receiving child care subsidy can combine the various modalities of care (legally-exempt, child care center, group family day care, etc.) to accommodate various schedules and needs.  Some children may benefit from one-on-one care provided by a legally-exempt provider whereas some children may thrive in a larger, center setting. A parent who is employed overnight is more likely to need a provider who provides care during non-traditional hours, while a parent working during the day would not have this need. To incentivize the availability of care during non-traditional hours, OCFS requires LDSSs to pay a minimum differential rate of 5 percent for providers who provide child care services during non-traditional hours. LDSSs can pay a differential rate up to 15 percent to these providers. Policies are also in place to support families who require care for 24 hours in a day as well as for those families that may require the use of multiple child care providers over the course of a day or week. As per 18 NYCRR 415.4 (c)(4), “when arranging child care services, the needs of the child must be taken into account including: continuity of child care.” Continuity of care is foundational in Group Family Day Care (GFDC) regulations 18 NYCRR 416 and in Family Day Care (FDC) regulations 18 NYCRR 417. In 2015, OCFS revised day care center regulations 18 NYCRR  418-1 to formalize this as an option for centers. This promotes what had been allowed previously only through a waiver process. Centers using the concept maintain a primary relationship between teachers and children and their respective families. Children and their teachers stay together until all children in the group are 36 months of age. A child has a primary caregiver/teacher who becomes responsible for the child and for communication with the child's parents, with other teachers serving as back-up. The teachers must have training on continuity of care, developing positive relationships with each child assigned to his/her care, and tending to their physical and emotional needs. The teacher/child ratio and maximum group size is based on the youngest child in the group. This takes children’s development and learning into consideration, as well as promoting safety. Prior to implementing continuity of care, centers submit their model to OCFS for approval. OCFS training on continuity of care concepts and models was rolled out in 2015. Additional resources are available on the website of our training contractor at: https://www.ecetp.pdp.albany.edu/VideoLibrary/VideoLibraryList.aspx (search for “continuity”). Several online courses on mixed age groups have been approved for use towards OCFS training requirements for caregivers, and CCR&Rs periodically offer classroom trainings on the concept. Also see related content in 2.6.1.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.1.6 and 3.1.6-2: Eligible Children and Families - Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families
    Children with Special Needs
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Co-pay is waived for families with a child or parent receiving SSI.
    Families with Very Low Incomes
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Not available
    Not available
    Children Experiencing Homelessness
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Yes
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    LDSSs must pay eligible licensed and registered child care providers a differential payment rate of at least 5 percent above the actual cost of care or the applicable market rate for care of children in families experiencing homelessness. LDSSs may choose to set a differential payment greater than 5 percent above the actual cost of care or the applicable market rate provided the rate does not exceed 15 percent.
    Families Receiving TANF*
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Not available
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    TANF families participating in employment or required activities are guaranteed child care. The co-pay is waived for families on TANF. Families that are transitioning off TANF due to increased income or child support are guaranteed child care for 12-months after their TANF case has closed provided they meet financial and programmatic requirements. Employed families that are eligible for TANF but request child care assistance in lieu of TANF are also guaranteed child care as long as they remain eligible for TANF. As they become financially ineligible for TANF, these families are guaranteed child care assistance for 12-months provided they meet financial and programmatic requirements.
    * Includes families receiving TANF program funds, those transitioning off TANF through work activities, or those at risk of becoming dependent on TANF.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.2.2a, 3.2.2b, 3.2.2c, 3.2.2d, 3.2.2a-2, 3.2.2b-2, 3.2.2c-2, and 3.2.2d-2: Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Supply of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Not available
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Not available
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    N/A
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Quality of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Not available
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Not available
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    N/A
    Base payment rates and percentiles
    Age Center Percentile of most recent MRS Family Child Care Percentile of most recent MRS
    Infant $ 371.00/ week (New York City) 69th $ 200.00/ week (New York City) 69th
    Toddler $ 268.00/ week (New York City) 69th $ 185.00/ week (New York City) 69th
    Preschool $ 242.00/ week (New York City) 69th $ 175.00/ week (New York City) 69th
    School Age $ 210.00/ week (New York City) 69th $ 160.00/ week (New York City) 69th
    Effective date of payment rates: 6/1/2016
    Market rate survey (MRS) date: 3/20/2018
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.3.1: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.2.5a: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Tiered Reimbursement or Differential Rates
    • Differential rate for non-traditional hours. Describe
    Yes
    • Differential rate for children with special needs, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Differential rate for infants and toddlers. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for infants/toddlers with no separate bonus or add-on
    Not available
    • Differential rate for school-age programs. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for school-age children with no separate bonus or add-on.
    Not available
    • Differential rate for higher quality, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Other differential rates or tiered rates.
    Yes
    • Tiered or differential rates are not implemented.
    Not available
    CCDF Co-Payemts by Family Size
    CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size
    (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f)
    Family Size Lowest “Entry” Income Level Where Family Is First Charged Co-Pay (Greater Than $0) What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (a)? The Co-Payment in Column (b) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (a)? Highest “Entry” Income Level Before a Family Is No Longer Eligible What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (d)? The Co-Payment in Column (e) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (d)?
    3 $1,732.00 $65.00 3.7 $3,463.00 $589.00 17
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.1a Family Size of 3: Family Contribution to Payment - CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Family Contribution to Payment
    • No, the Lead Agency does not waive family contributions/co-payments.
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families with an income at or below the Federal poverty level for families of the same size.
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services, as determined by the Lead Agency for purposes of CCDF eligibility. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation..
    Not available
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for other criteria established by the Lead Agency. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation
    Yes
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for other criteria (See table below)
    Described Below
    18 NYCRR §415.3(e)(1) provides that families receiving Temporary Assistance and families experiencing homelessness must not be required to pay a family share for child care services.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.4: Family Contribution to Payment - Family Contribution to Payment. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Health and Safety

    Child-Staff Ratios by Group Size by Age of Children for Licensed Child Care Centers
    Age of Children Child-Staff Ratio Group Size
    Infant (11 months) 4:1 8
    Toddler (35 months) 5:1 12
    Preschool (59months) 7:1 18
    School-age (6 years) 10:1 20
    School-age (10 years and older) 15:1 30
    If any of the responses above are different for exempt child care centers, describe which requirements apply: Described Below
    The ratios and maximum group sizes for legally-exempt center-based care are as follows:
    ▪ 3 years 1:20 for seated activities, 1:10 for all other, maximum group size of 30
    ▪ 4 years 1:20 for seated activities, 1:12 for all other, maximum group size of 36
    ▪ 5 years- 12 years 1:25 for all activities, maximum group size of 50
    More restrictive standards may apply to programs operated under the auspices of another government organization including, but not limited to the following
    • NYS Education Department Voluntarily Registered Nursery Schools
    ◦ Ratios:
    ▪ 3 years 1:8
    ▪ 4 years 1:10
    ▪ 5 years 1:15
    ◦Max Group Size:
    ▪3/4 years old: 20 student maximum
    ▪ 5 years old: 22 student maximum
    • NYS Department of Health Summer Day Camps
    ◦ Ratios:
    ▪ Under age 6 during camp trip/special activities- 1:6
    ▪ Under age 6 during camp trip/special activities- 1:6
    ▪ Passive activity; no age specified-1:25
    ▪ Summer day/traveling summer day-1:12
    • NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Summer Day Camps
    ◦ Ratios:
    General Camp Activities:
    ▪ Under age 6 - 1:6
    ▪ Ages 6-7 1:9
    ▪ Ages 8 and up- 1:12

    Offsite camp trips:
    ▪ All age groups- 1:5 minimum ratio

    Water Activities:
    ▪ Under the age of 6- 1:4
    ▪ Ages 6-7 1:6
    ▪ Ages 8 and up 1:7
    ▪ Lifeguards are one for every 25 swimmers
    Source(s): National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance. (2021). 2020 Child Care Licensing Study: Analysis of child care licensing regulations. [Unpublished data].

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 5.2.1a-5_6_7: Standards on ratios, group sizes, and qualifications for CCDF providers.– exempt child care centers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Quality Improvement

    Use of Quality Funds
    Yes/No CCDF Funds Other Funds Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Not available Not available Not available Not available
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Supporting accreditation Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Not available Not available Not available Not available
    Use of Quality Funds - Continued
    Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce Not available
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Not available
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system Private philanthropic dollars from a consortium of NYC-based private foundations.
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Not available
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards Not available
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Not available
    Supporting accreditation Not available
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development Not available
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Not available
    Source(s):
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-1: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-2: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-3: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-4: Use of Quality Funds - Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-5: Use of Quality Funds - Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-6: Use of Quality Funds - Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-7: Use of Quality Funds - Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territory. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-8: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting accreditation. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-9: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-10: Use of Quality Funds - Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency
    Application in other languages (application document, brochures, provider notices) Yes
    Informational materials in non-English languages Yes
    Website in non-English languages Yes
    Lead Agency accepts applications at local community-based locations Not available
    Bilingual caseworkers or translators available Yes
    Bilingual outreach workers Not available
    Partnerships with community-based organizations Yes
    Other Yes
    Describe Other Described Below
    The website can be translated using Google Translate, and also directs the public to phone numbers that may be called should the user have any additional questions or concerns about what is posted to the website, or need assistance due to accessibility issues. OCFS also uses contracted translation services to assist in communicating with non-English speaking individuals. NYS  Governor Andrew Cuomo issued Executive Order No. 26 which requires State agencies that provide direct public services to translate vital documents, including essential public documents such as forms and instructions provided to or completed by program beneficiaries or participants. The translation must be in the six most common non-English languages spoken by individuals with limited-English proficiency in the State of New York, based on United States census data, and relevant to services offered by each of the state agencies.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.1-1 and 2.1.1-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families for whom English is not their first language. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with a Person(s) with Disabilities
    Applications and public informational materials available in Braille and other communication formats for access by individuals with disabilities Yes
    Websites that are accessible (e.g., Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act) Yes
    Caseworkers with specialized training/experience in working with individuals with disabilities Not available
    Ensuring accessibility of environments and activities for all children Yes
    Partnerships with state and local programs and associations focused on disability-related topics and issues Yes
    Partnerships with parent associations, support groups, and parent-to-parent support groups, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) federally funded Parent Training and Information Centers Yes
    Partnerships with state and local IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C providers and agencies Yes
    Availability and/or access to specialized services (e.g., mental health, behavioral specialists, therapists) to address the needs of all children Not available
    Other Yes
    Describe Other Described Below
    OCFS licensed/registered programs work with families and health care providers to create and document the Health Care plan to provide appropriate care for children with special health care needs. Regulations also speak to compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act relative to administering medication. Health care plans required for programs address special health care needs and disabilities.
    Programs and OCFS also share resources for families affected by disabilities. This includes a portion of website (Resources for Families), and the programs sharing community resources directly with families.

    In addition, when a parent calls a CCR&R for a referral, the counselor enters information provided into a database, which then generates a “child care profile.” This profile includes any special needs a child may have. CCR&Rs then try to provide no fewer than three referrals. In cases where parents are seeking child care for children with disabilities, CCR&Rs ask parents if their child requires any services or supports, and they contribute their data to the state report on the number of parent-identified special needs requests. They offer technical assistance and resource materials to providers who have questions or challenges related to children in care, and work cooperatively with Early Intervention to facilitate services in child care settings. It is important to note that CCR&Rs consider state programs that serve children with disabilities, like Early Intervention or Pre-School Special Education or federally funded Head Start to be partners in trying to provide services to families.

    All of NY’s CCR&Rs have access to 711 to assist callers who use Text Telephone (TTY) services. Some CCR&Rs have access to telecommunications devices for the deaf (TDD). In addition, many sites are ADA accessible or on the first floor. If a site is not on the first floor, elevators are available or staff will make arrangements to meet with the family in a first floor conference room. If a parent has difficulty visiting a building or making a telephone call they are able to visit them at their home to provide information and referrals. CCR&R staff do all that they can to assist any consumer. They work to remove any barriers of communication by using available resources.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.2-1 and 2.1.2-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families with a person(s) with a disability. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Consumer Education Website
    How the Lead Agency ensures that its website is consumer-friendly and easily accessible OCFS has a consumer-friendly "Search for Child Care" website for parents, providers, and the general public. Information on the website is easily accessible as it includes drop-down menus to help narrow a more detailed search (e.g., Search for Child Care, Resources for Families, Information for Providers, Information for Parents, Becoming a Child Care Provider, Training Information, Advantage After School Program, Local Departments of Social Services, Regulations, Policies, Laws, Forms, Publications, Plans and Reports, Child Care Subsidy Program, QUALITYstarsNY, Public Presentations, etc.) The website has had 1,206,681 search visitors since 2015 and is promoted through social media (Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram). The website allows the user to search for available licensed/registered child care services by map, facility name, county, facility number, facility type, zip code, school district, those that administer medication, and those offering non-traditional hours of care. Information concerning inspection history and results and a brief description of any out-of-compliance regulations is available in the facility search. In addition, it offers details about the program including: inspection date, violations, whether violations have been corrected, address of the program, contact names and numbers, total capacity numbers, how long the child care program has operated, if the program has been in an enforcement status in the past five years, and whether it is currently on the state’s referral list. The website includes child care options videos at https://ocfs.ny.gov/main/childcare/brochure.asp. The videos allow parents to view videos regarding the different modalities of care, so that they may choose what would best serve their child and family. The website (http://ocfs.ny.gov/main/childcare/infoforparents.asp) also includes numerous informational brochures (e.g., A Parent’s Guide to Child Care Options) and instructions to the user to contact the OCFS regional office for additional information about the program listed. There are 32 Child Care Resource and Referral agencies and 3 NYC CCR&R sub-contractors available in New York State and their contact information (listed alphabetically by the counties they serve), can be found at on the OCFS website at http://ocfs.ny.gov/main/childcare/referralagencies.asp. OCFS worked with stakeholders, including parents, to gather additional feedback on the accessibility of the OCFS website. The feedback was taken under consideration and changes were incorporated to the website to make it more consumer-friendly and easily accessible.
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for families that speak languages other than English The OCFS website has a translate page section that allows families to translate the pages into 91 languages. Users of the website who are non-English speaking may call the contact numbers listed and OCFS can conference in an interpreter from Language Line Services.
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for persons with disabilities If the user has a disability, English is not the primary language, or the format of any part of the website(s) or web-based applications owned by OCFS interferes with a user’s ability to access any of the information on the site, the user is instructed to email OCFS at info@ocfs.ny.gov or call (518) 473-7793. OCFS refers the request to the appropriate staff, and, if feasible, provides the user with an accommodation or alternate format of the requested material. Accessibility information and Notice of Reasonable Accommodation can be found at http://ocfs.ny.gov/help/reasonable-accommodation.asp

    Information about the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is on the OCFS website at: http://ocfs.ny.gov/main/childcare/Resources_for_Families.asp. Information about this program can also be found on the New York State Education Department website at: http://www.nysed.gov/gsearch/idea.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.3.1, 2.3.1, and 2.3.3: Consumer Education Website. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Footnotes

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