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State and Territory Profile

STATE/TERRITORY PROFILE - NEW HAMPSHIRE

This profile highlights a current innovative effort to promote a subsidy system that is child-focused, family friendly, and fair to providers. It also provides demographic information, Early Care and Education (ECE) program participation and funding, subsidy innovation and program integrity information, program quality improvement activities, and professional development and workforce initiatives. Sources and links are provided at the end of the document

Demographics

Total Population 12 and Under
Total Population 12 and Under. Under 3-Years Old: Total 40474, Percentage 20; 3 and 4-Years Old: Total 29332 Percentage 15; 5 through 12-Years Old: Total 127637 Percentage 65
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (n.d.). In American Community Survey, 2010. QT-P2 Single Years of Age and Sex. Retrieved from American FactFinder: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_SF1_QTP2&prodType=table
Children Living in Working Families
Children Living in Working Families: Children under 6-Years-Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.207293249403082 and with two working parents 0.536615476448882; Children Ages 6 to 17-Years Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.254075813087658 and with two working parents 0.53323492097369
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. B17024: Age By Ratio Of Income To Poverty Level In The Past 12 Months - Universe: Population for whom poverty status is determined. https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=B17024&g=0100000US.04000.001&hidePreview=true&table=B17024&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.B17024&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019&mode=&y=2019
Poverty Statistics
Poverty Statistics: 0.214432063026265 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.0731913656131446 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty; 0.168888429015699 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.069394864366151 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty
  Below 100% of Poverty Below 185% of Poverty
Under 6-Years Old 7.32% 21.44%
6 to 17-Years Old 6.94% 16.89%
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. C23008 Age of own Children under 18 Years in Families and Subfamilies by Living Arrangements by Employment Status of Parents: Universe: Own children under 18 years in families and subfamilies.
https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=C23008&g=&hidePreview=false&table=C23008&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.C23008&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019

ECE Program Participation and Funding

Percentage and Number of Children/Families Served
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage
of Children in Care By Age Group
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage<br>of Children in Care By Age Group. Under 3-Years Old: 30%; 3 and 4-Years Old: 35%; 5 through 12-Years Old: 35%
CCDF Average Monthly Number
of Children and Families Served
Average Monthly number of Children and Families Served: Children 4500 and Families 3300
Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 9 Average Monthly Percentages of Children In Care By Age Group https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-9
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates].Table 1 Average Monthly Adjusted Number of Families and Children Served.
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-1
  • Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care
    Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Licensed or Regulated Providers: Center 92%, Group Home 0%, Family Home 4%, Child's Home 4%
    Non-Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Legally Operating Without Regulations: Center 0%, Group Home 0%, Family Home 2%, Child's Home 2%
    Note: Unregulated provider data includes relative and non-relative care.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 6 Average Monthly
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-6
    Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)
    • Total CCDF Expenditure (Including Quality):
    $34,987,692
    • CCDF Federal Expenditure:
    $24,676,658
    • CCDF State/Territory Expenditure:
    $10,311,034
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2020). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2018 (all appropriation years). Table 4a: All expenditures by State- Categorical Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-4a

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2020). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2018 (all appropriation years). Table 3a - All Expenditures by State – Detailed Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-3a
    CCDF Quality Expenditures
    • Total Quality Expenditure:
    $2,969,534
    • Quality Activities (Set Aside Funds):
    $2,777,947
    • Infant and Toddler (Targeted Funds):
    $191,587
    • Quality Expansion Funds (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    • School-Age/Resource and Referral (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for Child Care
    • TANF – Total Child Care Expenditure:
    $7,700,100
    Bullet icon TANF – Direct Expenditure on Child Care: $100
    Bullet icon TANF – Transfer to CCDF: $7,700,000
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance. (2020). Fiscal Year 2019 TANF Financial Data. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ofa/resource/tanf-financial-data-fy-2019
    ChildCare Tax Credits
    • Tax Credit Federal Total Amount Claimed:
    $360,107
    • Tax Credit Federal Number of Claims:
    157,700
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Available - 2015:
    No
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Refundable:
    No
    Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)
    • CACFP Funding:
    $4,639,368
    • Number of Family Child Care Homes Participating:
    62
    • Number of Child Care Centers (includes Head Start Programs) Participating:
    191
    Source(s): Food Research and Action Center. (2020). State of the States: Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) in FY 2019. http://www.frac.org/maps/sos/tables/sos_tab_cacfp.html
    Head Start
    • Head Start Federal Allocation:
    $14,745,707
    • Head Start State/Territory Allocation:
    Not available
    • Number of Children Participating:
    1,178
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2020). The 2019 state of preschool yearbook. http://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/2019-2
    IDEA Part B, Section 619
    • IDEA Part B Funding:
    $1,608,216
    • Number of Children Served (Ages 3- through 5-Years-Old):
    3,809
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    IDEA Part C
    • IDEA Part C Funding:
    $2,333,044
    • Number of Children Served (Ages Birth through 2-Years-Old):
    2,105
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    Pre-kindergarten
    • Pre-kindergarten Total Expenditure:
    Not available
    • Enrollment (4-year-olds and under):
    Not available
    Note: Total Expenditure includes all State/Territory, Local, and Federal dollars. In addition to 3 and 4-year-olds, some Pre-kindergarten programs enroll children of other ages.
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2021). The 2020 state of preschool yearbook. https://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/yearbook2020

    CCDF Subsidy Program Administration

    Family Percentile Recent MRS
    Income Eligibility at Determination
    (a) (b) (c) (d)
    Family Size100 % of SMI ($/Month) 85% of SMI($/Month)
    [Multiply(a) by 0.85]
    (IF APPLICABLE) ($/Month) Maximum Initial or First Tier Income Limit (or Threshold) if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI IF APPLICABLE) (% of SMI) [Divide(c) by (a), multiply by 100] Income Level if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI
    3 $7,166.00 $6,091.00 $3,810.00 53%
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.1.3 Family Size of 3: Eligible Children and Families - Income Eligibility at Determination. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care
    • Coordinating with Head Start, prekindergarten, or other early learning programs to create a package of arrangements that accommodates parents’ work schedules
    Yes
    • Inquiring about whether the child has an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Individual Family Services Plan (IFSP)
    Not available
    • Establishing minimum eligibility periods greater than 12 months
    Not available
    • Using cross-enrollment or referrals to other public benefits
    Yes
    • Working with IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C staff to explore how services included in a child’s IEP or IFSP can be supported and/or provided onsite and in collaboration with child care services
    Not available
    • Providing more intensive case management for families with children with multiple risk factors;
    Yes
    • Implementing policies and procedures that promote universal design to ensure that activities and environments are accessible to all children, including children with sensory, physical, or other disabilities
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    BCDHSC partners with Head Start and utilizes a DCYF/Head Start Memorandum of Agreement to enable wrap-around services for children who are enrolled in Head Start for part of the day to attend child care for a remaining portion of the day. The agreement specifies that child care programs may bill the NH Child Care Scholarship Program for the full-day rate for children who attend Head Start for part of the day and then attend child care the rest of the day. For children receiving DCYF Preventive care, the family must have a family service plan that focuses on barriers, needs of the child, and goals, which is developed with both family and worker input. For children receiving DCYF Protective services, the NH Child Care Scholarship Program covers the cost share and copayment amount in order to remove any financial barriers and to improve continuity of care. NH pays a special need differential to child care providers on behalf of eligible children, which is intended to be used for accommodation or classroom adaptation in the child care setting. The cumulative effect of these weekly payments for a child can increase continuity of specialized care received in a particular child care program. NH distributed approximately 10,000 copies of the Early Learning Standards statewide to provide essential information to support and enhance children’s development and learning. The NH Early Learning Standards guide contains a section titled, “Differences in Development,” which outlines developmental milestones at various age intervals. These milestones may help families and professionals who work with children from birth through age five identify potential delays in development that may be a cause for concern. If there is an identified concern about a child’s development, the section in the document “Partnering with Families When You Have a Concern About a Child’s Development” helps guide professionals about the process that could be followed to help families ensure a child receives follow-up services to address the concern. The document also provides resources in the section titled, “Where to Get Help.” This section has information about NH’s development screening system called “Watch Me Grow.” Families and professionals also have information about NH’s early intervention system, “Family-Centered Early Supports and Services (FCESS)” for children from birth to 3 years of age, and information about Preschool Special Education Services for children ages 3 – 5. An overview of the special education process also helps families understand the basics about the Individualized Education Program (IEP) process.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.1.6 and 3.1.6-2: Eligible Children and Families - Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families
    Children with Special Needs
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Not available
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Yes
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    A child experiencing significant special needs means a child through the age of 17 who has a verified medical, physical, developmental, educational and/or emotional disability requiring additional funds for accommodation or classroom adaptation in the child care setting, and children receiving preventive or protective NH Child Care Scholarship. DHHS prioritizes these children by providing a differential payment to child care providers who certify that they need additional funds to care for a child experiencing significant special needs and that a physician, physician's assistant, advance practice registered nurse, licensed mental health professional or a SAU Special Education Director or Area Agency Director certifies that a child's significant special need requires additional support. For a child age 13 through 17 years of age, the physician, physician's assistant, advance practice registered nurse, or licensed mental health professional must certify that the child's condition limits the child's ability to care for him/herself or he/she would cause harm to him/herself or others without supervision.

    The payment is made weekly based on the child's full-time, half-time or part-time attendance. The weekly differential payment for full time attendance is $50, for half time attendance is $30, and for part time attendance is $15. Children with special needs receive the same eligibility priority as other CCDF-eligible children. Children receiving preventive or protective child care or who are within 92 days of transitioning out of preventive or protective child care are exempt from a wait list when the parent applies for employment-related NH Child Care Scholarship. Cost share may be waived for these families on a case-by-case basis. Child care providers who are serving children with special needs may receive specialized technical assistance to their program at no cost with the express intent of including children in the program and preventing suspension and expulsion.
    Families with Very Low Incomes
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    1) Families whose income is at or below 100% of the Federal Poverty Level who are not receiving TANF; and 2) Families currently receiving TANF benefits or are within 92 calendar days of TANF benefits ending. Families in the first category would be placed on the high priority wait list, when one is in effect, where they will be released twice as quickly as those families on the non-priority wait list. Families in the second category are guaranteed to receive NH Child Care Scholarship. Currently there is no wait list in NH.
    Children Experiencing Homelessness
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
     Families who meet the McKinney-Vento definition of homelessness are eligible for Expedited Child Care to improve access to child care services. Expedited child care must be determined within 7 calendar days of the date of application with a final eligibility decision made within 30 calendar days. The child care provider must be a currently enrolled DHHS child care provider. Expedited child care is allowed with a person’s self-attestation as verification of homelessness and that the parent is participating in employment, training, education or job search. A parent is not required to verify income or complete Form 1863 "Provider Verification" to be determined eligible for expedited child care. NH requires the family services specialist to ask a family if they meet the McKinney-Vento definition of homelessness, if they report they live in a home or apartment. Families are prompted to respond to this question when applying online through NH EASY. FSS are trained to inform families of the opportunity to receive expedited child care to improve access to child care services. In addition, Child Care Aware of New Hampshire, statewide Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R), participates in the Homelessness Task Force and screens for indications of homelessness during the intake process when providing referrals for families. They are familiar with expedited child care and will also refer families experiencing homelessness to other resources and programs that might benefit them. If they identify a family as homeless, they track it in their referral database. He-C 4002.17(a), He-C 6916.09(l), and He-C 6917.09(k) provide families experiencing homelessness and children in foster care 60 days to obtain immunization records.
    Families Receiving TANF*
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Not available
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Services are prioritized as follows: Families who are receiving TANF or who have transitioned off TANF in the past 92 calendar days; families currently experiencing homelessness or whose families have found housing after experiencing homelessness within the past 92 calendar days; families whose preventive or protective child care services closed in the past 92 calendar days; and families receiving NH Child Care Scholarship with a single parent who is placed on orders or deployed for military service if the single parent will be out of NH for more than 30 calendar days and their legal guardian applies and is determined eligible for NH Child Care Scholarship. The legal guardian’s income is not counted unless his or her own children are receiving NH Child Care Scholarship. Families whose single parent returns from military service out-of-state and reapplies for child care and is determined eligible are not subject to a wait list, when one is in effect. Families who are at or below 100% of FPL and not receiving TANF, but may be at risk for becoming dependent on TANF, are placed on a high priority wait list, when one is in effect, and released twice as quickly from the wait list as other CCDF eligible families.
    * Includes families receiving TANF program funds, those transitioning off TANF through work activities, or those at risk of becoming dependent on TANF.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.2.2a, 3.2.2b, 3.2.2c, 3.2.2d, 3.2.2a-2, 3.2.2b-2, 3.2.2c-2, and 3.2.2d-2: Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Supply of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Not available
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Not available
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    N/A
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Quality of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Not available
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Not available
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    N/A
    Base payment rates and percentiles
    Age Center Percentile of most recent MRS Family Child Care Percentile of most recent MRS
    Infant $ 222.50/ week 50th $ 172.50/ week 50th
    Toddler $ 210.00/ week 50th $ 167.50/ week 50th
    Preschool $ 185.00/ week 50th $ 152.50/ week 50th
    School Age $ 141.40/ week 50th $ 78.22/ week 50th
    Effective date of payment rates: 7/3/2017
    Market rate survey (MRS) date: 7/18/2016
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.3.1: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.2.5a: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Tiered Reimbursement or Differential Rates
    • Differential rate for non-traditional hours. Describe
    Not available
    • Differential rate for children with special needs, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Differential rate for infants and toddlers. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for infants/toddlers with no separate bonus or add-on
    Not available
    • Differential rate for school-age programs. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for school-age children with no separate bonus or add-on.
    Not available
    • Differential rate for higher quality, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Other differential rates or tiered rates.
    Not available
    • Tiered or differential rates are not implemented.
    Not available
    CCDF Co-Payemts by Family Size
    CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size
    (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f)
    Family Size Lowest “Entry” Income Level Where Family Is First Charged Co-Pay (Greater Than $0) What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (a)? The Co-Payment in Column (b) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (a)? Highest “Entry” Income Level Before a Family Is No Longer Eligible What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (d)? The Co-Payment in Column (e) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (d)?
    3 $1.00 $0.05 4.75 $3,744.00 $636.48 17
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.1a Family Size of 3: Family Contribution to Payment - CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Family Contribution to Payment
    • No, the Lead Agency does not waive family contributions/co-payments.
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families with an income at or below the Federal poverty level for families of the same size.
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services, as determined by the Lead Agency for purposes of CCDF eligibility. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation..
    Yes
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services
    NH Child Care Scholarship Program payments for Preventive child care are based on the DHHS NH Child Care Scholarship Standard Rate methodology pursuant to He-C 6910.17 (a)-(f) except that DHHS does not subtract the family’s costs from the DHHS Weekly Standard Rate. The family support agency does not authorize any additional child care fees or co-payments in addition to or that exceed the DHHS NH Child Care Scholarship Weekly Standard Rate. NH Child Care Scholarship for payments for Protective child care are based on the DHHS Weekly Standard Rate as described above and the difference between the Weekly Standard Rate and the child care provider’s actual charge, if requested. Preventive and Protective Child Care Eligibility rule He-C 6912.07.
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for other criteria established by the Lead Agency. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation
    Not available
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for other criteria (See table below)
    Not available
    Not available
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.4: Family Contribution to Payment - Family Contribution to Payment. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Health and Safety

    Child-Staff Ratios by Group Size by Age of Children for Licensed Child Care Centers
    Age of Children Child-Staff Ratio Group Size
    Infant (11 months) 4:1 12
    Toddler (35 months) 6:1 18
    Preschool (59months) 12:1 24
    School-age (6 years) 15:1 30
    School-age (10 years and older) 15:1 30
    If any of the responses above are different for exempt child care centers, describe which requirements apply: Described Below
    Staff to Child Ratio and Group Size: [He-C 6916.15] The staff to child ratio for school-age programs shall be one staff for 15 children with a maximum group size of 60. In addition to the staffing requirements in (a) above, programs shall have a second staff person in the building when 13 or more children are present. (c)Programs shall provide a minimum of 40 square feet of usable indoor space per child. Indoor active play space shall be available to children daily. In addition to (a) above, programs offering drop-in care shall monitor attendance records to ensure compliance with group size and ratios. If there is a pattern of exceeding ratio and group size then additional staff shall be added. Attendance records shall be kept on file for review by the department. The only exception to (a) above shall be when children combine for time-limited activities, such as meals, snacks, daily meetings, short stories, special guest presentations, or other special events, provided that all children have sufficient room for the activity. LE child care centers are not required to meet Qualifications for school age teachers [He-C 4002.32].
    Source(s): National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance. (2021). 2020 Child Care Licensing Study: Analysis of child care licensing regulations. [Unpublished data].

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 5.2.1a-5_6_7: Standards on ratios, group sizes, and qualifications for CCDF providers.– exempt child care centers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Quality Improvement

    Use of Quality Funds
    Yes/No CCDF Funds Other Funds Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Supporting accreditation Not available Not available Not available Not available
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Not available Yes Not available Not available
    Use of Quality Funds - Continued
    Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce NH's philanthropic community has provided considerable funds to support the child care workforce.
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Not available
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system Not available
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Not available
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards Not available
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Not available
    Supporting accreditation Not available
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development NH's philanthropic community.
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Not available
    Source(s):
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-1: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-2: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-3: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-4: Use of Quality Funds - Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-5: Use of Quality Funds - Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-6: Use of Quality Funds - Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-7: Use of Quality Funds - Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territory. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-8: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting accreditation. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-9: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-10: Use of Quality Funds - Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency
    Application in other languages (application document, brochures, provider notices) Yes
    Informational materials in non-English languages Yes
    Website in non-English languages Yes
    Lead Agency accepts applications at local community-based locations Yes
    Bilingual caseworkers or translators available Yes
    Bilingual outreach workers Yes
    Partnerships with community-based organizations Yes
    Other Not available
    Describe Other Not available
    Not available
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.1-1 and 2.1.1-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families for whom English is not their first language. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with a Person(s) with Disabilities
    Applications and public informational materials available in Braille and other communication formats for access by individuals with disabilities Yes
    Websites that are accessible (e.g., Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act) Yes
    Caseworkers with specialized training/experience in working with individuals with disabilities Not available
    Ensuring accessibility of environments and activities for all children Yes
    Partnerships with state and local programs and associations focused on disability-related topics and issues Yes
    Partnerships with parent associations, support groups, and parent-to-parent support groups, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) federally funded Parent Training and Information Centers Yes
    Partnerships with state and local IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C providers and agencies Yes
    Availability and/or access to specialized services (e.g., mental health, behavioral specialists, therapists) to address the needs of all children Yes
    Other Yes
    Describe Other Described Below
    Partnership with the University of NH, Institute on Disability on multiple state initiatives and on professional development relative to inclusive practices.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.2-1 and 2.1.2-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families with a person(s) with a disability. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Consumer Education Website
    How the Lead Agency ensures that its website is consumer-friendly and easily accessible DHHS contracts with Child Care Aware of NH to host and maintain the consumer education website. The website is a user-friendly, regularly updated site that meets best practices standards for Child Care Aware of America, National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and National Afterschool Association (NAA). It incorporates resource buttons for use with tablets and smartphones to accommodate the increasing number of people who use these modalities.

    This site offers a "How Do I?" tab that addresses frequently asked questions in addition to a search feature. The main page directs the consumer to different featured tabs or "buttons" that include child care search (online referral search), NH Professional Registry (online workforce history for users and training search), Child Care Licensing Unit, Child Care Aware Training Academy and additional tabs specific for families, providers, resources, and data reports. A list of informative and related resources and links for both families and providers are provided on the main page of the website, with tabs specific to the various stakeholder groups as outlined below:

    The "Families" tab provides the following selections: Helping Children Grow; Quality Care Matters; Types of Child Care; Child Care Licensing; and Family Resources with sub-sections on Emergency Planning; Wellness & Safety Resources.
    The "Providers" tab provides the following selections: Helping Children Grow; Child Care Licensing; Quality Matters Professional Development; Child Care Aware Training Academy (an online customizable training component); Annual Training Calendar; First Aid & CPR; Health & Safety Trainings and Resources; Emergency Planning; Smart Horizons Online trainings; and Provider Resources.

    In addition, the main page includes a funding disclaimer and complaint policy, along with social media links to Facebook and Pinterest.
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for families that speak languages other than English The website ensures that families that speak languages other than English will have access to all resources by utilizing the Google Translate service. This service is accessible by self–selecting the language choice button on the main page. This service translates the entire website navigation system and web-created pages into the chosen language. Child Care Aware of NH is in the process of further enhancing access for families that speak languages other than English by upgrading the linked databases and other information with translation software or pre-translated documents. This will support compliance with state mandates and best practice guidelines.
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for persons with disabilities Through Child Care Aware of NH, individuals can request that information be made available in alternate formats. Child Care of Aware of NH’s contact information is provided on the “Contact Us” page. Child Care Aware of NH has contracted with a website developer to redesign the Consumer Education website. The new website will be 508 compliant, augmenting the current available services and increasing accessibility to individuals with disabilities. The work has begun and will continue through Spring of 2019.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.3.1, 2.3.1, and 2.3.3: Consumer Education Website. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Footnotes

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