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State and Territory Profile

STATE/TERRITORY PROFILE - NORTH CAROLINA

This profile highlights a current innovative effort to promote a subsidy system that is child-focused, family friendly, and fair to providers. It also provides demographic information, Early Care and Education (ECE) program participation and funding, subsidy innovation and program integrity information, program quality improvement activities, and professional development and workforce initiatives. Sources and links are provided at the end of the document

Demographics

Total Population 12 and Under
Total Population 12 and Under. Under 3-Years Old: Total 376163, Percentage 23; 3 and 4-Years Old: Total 255877 Percentage 15; 5 through 12-Years Old: Total 1019440 Percentage 62
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (n.d.). In American Community Survey, 2010. QT-P2 Single Years of Age and Sex. Retrieved from American FactFinder: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_SF1_QTP2&prodType=table
Children Living in Working Families
Children Living in Working Families: Children under 6-Years-Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.293469676672068 and with two working parents 0.379832807810882; Children Ages 6 to 17-Years Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.313439343872192 and with two working parents 0.417610179391357
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. B17024: Age By Ratio Of Income To Poverty Level In The Past 12 Months - Universe: Population for whom poverty status is determined. https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=B17024&g=0100000US.04000.001&hidePreview=true&table=B17024&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.B17024&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019&mode=&y=2019
Poverty Statistics
Poverty Statistics: 0.418613021859595 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.218557537043228 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty; 0.379084937823326 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.184780898789476 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty
  Below 100% of Poverty Below 185% of Poverty
Under 6-Years Old 21.86% 41.86%
6 to 17-Years Old 18.48% 37.91%
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. C23008 Age of own Children under 18 Years in Families and Subfamilies by Living Arrangements by Employment Status of Parents: Universe: Own children under 18 years in families and subfamilies.
https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=C23008&g=&hidePreview=false&table=C23008&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.C23008&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019

ECE Program Participation and Funding

Percentage and Number of Children/Families Served
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage
of Children in Care By Age Group
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage<br>of Children in Care By Age Group. Under 3-Years Old: 27%; 3 and 4-Years Old: 29%; 5 through 12-Years Old: 44%
CCDF Average Monthly Number
of Children and Families Served
Average Monthly number of Children and Families Served: Children 49900 and Families 31200
Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 9 Average Monthly Percentages of Children In Care By Age Group https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-9
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates].Table 1 Average Monthly Adjusted Number of Families and Children Served.
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-1
  • Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care
    Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Licensed or Regulated Providers: Center 94%, Group Home 0%, Family Home 6%, Child's Home 6%
    Non-Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Legally Operating Without Regulations: Center 0%, Group Home 0%, Family Home 0%, Child's Home 0%
    Note: Unregulated provider data includes relative and non-relative care.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 6 Average Monthly
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-6
    Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)
    • Total CCDF Expenditure (Including Quality):
    $333,161,983
    • CCDF Federal Expenditure:
    $270,655,304
    • CCDF State/Territory Expenditure:
    $62,506,679
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2020). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2018 (all appropriation years). Table 4a: All expenditures by State- Categorical Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-4a

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2020). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2018 (all appropriation years). Table 3a - All Expenditures by State – Detailed Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-3a
    CCDF Quality Expenditures
    • Total Quality Expenditure:
    $31,017,244
    • Quality Activities (Set Aside Funds):
    $23,322,802
    • Infant and Toddler (Targeted Funds):
    $4,041,805
    • Quality Expansion Funds (Targeted Funds):
    $4,268,496
    • School-Age/Resource and Referral (Targeted Funds):
    $-615,859
    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for Child Care
    • TANF – Total Child Care Expenditure:
    $158,928,360
    Bullet icon TANF – Direct Expenditure on Child Care: $149,900,855
    Bullet icon TANF – Transfer to CCDF: $9,027,505
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance. (2020). Fiscal Year 2019 TANF Financial Data. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ofa/resource/tanf-financial-data-fy-2019
    ChildCare Tax Credits
    • Tax Credit Federal Total Amount Claimed:
    $2,369,693
    • Tax Credit Federal Number of Claims:
    1,211,090
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Available - 2015:
    No
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Refundable:
    No
    Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)
    • CACFP Funding:
    $99,403,740
    • Number of Family Child Care Homes Participating:
    1,317
    • Number of Child Care Centers (includes Head Start Programs) Participating:
    2,157
    Source(s): Food Research and Action Center. (2020). State of the States: Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) in FY 2019. http://www.frac.org/maps/sos/tables/sos_tab_cacfp.html
    Head Start
    • Head Start Federal Allocation:
    $149,849,238
    • Head Start State/Territory Allocation:
    Not available
    • Number of Children Participating:
    16,476
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2020). The 2019 state of preschool yearbook. http://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/2019-2
    IDEA Part B, Section 619
    • IDEA Part B Funding:
    $11,698,687
    • Number of Children Served (Ages 3- through 5-Years-Old):
    20,909
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    IDEA Part C
    • IDEA Part C Funding:
    $13,917,221
    • Number of Children Served (Ages Birth through 2-Years-Old):
    10,885
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    Pre-kindergarten
    • Pre-kindergarten Total Expenditure:
    $166,326,635
    • Enrollment (4-year-olds and under):
    31,059
    Note: Total Expenditure includes all State/Territory, Local, and Federal dollars. In addition to 3 and 4-year-olds, some Pre-kindergarten programs enroll children of other ages.
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2021). The 2020 state of preschool yearbook. https://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/yearbook2020

    CCDF Subsidy Program Administration

    Family Percentile Recent MRS
    Income Eligibility at Determination
    (a) (b) (c) (d)
    Family Size100 % of SMI ($/Month) 85% of SMI($/Month)
    [Multiply(a) by 0.85]
    (IF APPLICABLE) ($/Month) Maximum Initial or First Tier Income Limit (or Threshold) if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI IF APPLICABLE) (% of SMI) [Divide(c) by (a), multiply by 100] Income Level if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI
    3 $4,900.00 $4,165.00 $3,403.00 69%
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.1.3 Family Size of 3: Eligible Children and Families - Income Eligibility at Determination. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care
    • Coordinating with Head Start, prekindergarten, or other early learning programs to create a package of arrangements that accommodates parents’ work schedules
    Not available
    • Inquiring about whether the child has an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Individual Family Services Plan (IFSP)
    Yes
    • Establishing minimum eligibility periods greater than 12 months
    Not available
    • Using cross-enrollment or referrals to other public benefits
    Not available
    • Working with IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C staff to explore how services included in a child’s IEP or IFSP can be supported and/or provided onsite and in collaboration with child care services
    Not available
    • Providing more intensive case management for families with children with multiple risk factors;
    Not available
    • Implementing policies and procedures that promote universal design to ensure that activities and environments are accessible to all children, including children with sensory, physical, or other disabilities
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    The agency determining eligibility for the services could also have on file a Person-Centered Plan (PCP) as defined in 10A NCAC 70G .0402 to document the "special need" or "disability". Counties must establish a separate waiting list for children identified as having special needs. DSS/LPAs will now use the 4% set aside to serve vulnerable populations which includes children identified as having special needs. In addition, a local purchasing agency may supplement the provider's approved rate for additional costs incurred for a child with special needs who is enrolled in an inclusive setting.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.1.6 and 3.1.6-2: Eligible Children and Families - Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families
    Children with Special Needs
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Not available
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    DSS/LPAs will use the 4% set aside to serve vulnerable populations which includes children identified as having special needs. Counties must establish a separate waiting list for children identified as having special needs. Payment for these services is made with the vulnerable population set-aside. In addition, a local purchasing agency may supplement the provider's approved rate for additional costs incurred for a child with special needs who is enrolled in an inclusive setting. The supplement is paid from the set aside for vulnerable populations.
    Families with Very Low Incomes
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Not available
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Local purchasing agencies may establish priorities for serving children from the waiting list. In addition, fees are not assessed to families whose only source of income is "not countable"(as defined in child care subsidy policy); and fees are not charged for children with no income who live with someone other than a biological or adoptive parent, or with someone who does not have court-ordered financial responsibility.
    Children Experiencing Homelessness
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Procedures will be developed and implemented by October 2018 that allow for an initial eligibility determination to be made based on a family’s statement and the family will be given 30 days to provide documentation of their income and need for care. When this occurs, the child/ren will be authorized to begin child care immediately once the parents choose a provider and the provider will receive payment for services provided even if it is found that the family is not eligible once documentation has been provided.
    Families Receiving TANF*
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Not available
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Redetermination can be completed by phone with a follow-up signature on the paper application that will be mailed to the family in hardship situations. Parents may also complete an application and mail it to the local purchasing agency in hardship situations. Administrative Letter #05-16 effective June 1, 2016.
    * Includes families receiving TANF program funds, those transitioning off TANF through work activities, or those at risk of becoming dependent on TANF.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.2.2a, 3.2.2b, 3.2.2c, 3.2.2d, 3.2.2a-2, 3.2.2b-2, 3.2.2c-2, and 3.2.2d-2: Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Supply of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Not available
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Not available
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    NA
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Quality of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Not available
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Not available
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    NA
    Base payment rates and percentiles
    Age Center Percentile of most recent MRS Family Child Care Percentile of most recent MRS
    Infant $ 1050.00/ month (Four Star center in Mecklenburg) 75th percentile $ 762.00/ month (Four Star center in Mecklenburg) 75th percentile
    Toddler $ 1050.00/ month (Four Star center in Mecklenburg) 75th percentile $ 751.00/ month (Four Star center in Mecklenburg) 75th percentile
    Preschool $ 939.00/ month (Four Star center in Mecklenburg) 75th percentile $ 710.00/ month (Four Star center in Mecklenburg) 75th percentile.
    School Age $ 614.00/ month (Four Star center in Mecklenburg 64th percentile $ 525.00/ month (Four Star center in Mecklenburg) 69th percentile
    Effective date of payment rates: As of October 1, 2018 the market rates will change and reflect changes made in the 2018 legislative session.
    Market rate survey (MRS) date: 6/30/2018
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.3.1: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.2.5a: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Tiered Reimbursement or Differential Rates
    • Differential rate for non-traditional hours. Describe
    Not available
    • Differential rate for children with special needs, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Differential rate for infants and toddlers. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for infants/toddlers with no separate bonus or add-on
    Not available
    • Differential rate for school-age programs. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for school-age children with no separate bonus or add-on.
    Not available
    • Differential rate for higher quality, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Other differential rates or tiered rates.
    Yes
    • Tiered or differential rates are not implemented.
    Not available
    CCDF Co-Payemts by Family Size
    CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size
    (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f)
    Family Size Lowest “Entry” Income Level Where Family Is First Charged Co-Pay (Greater Than $0) What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (a)? The Co-Payment in Column (b) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (a)? Highest “Entry” Income Level Before a Family Is No Longer Eligible What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (d)? The Co-Payment in Column (e) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (d)?
    3 Not available Not available Not available
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.1a Family Size of 3: Family Contribution to Payment - CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Family Contribution to Payment
    • No, the Lead Agency does not waive family contributions/co-payments.
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families with an income at or below the Federal poverty level for families of the same size.
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services, as determined by the Lead Agency for purposes of CCDF eligibility. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation..
    Not available
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for other criteria established by the Lead Agency. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation
    Yes
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for other criteria (See table below)
    Described Below
    Co-payments are waived when child care services are provided in conjunction with a child protective services plan to enable the child to remain in his/her own home; when services are needed to support child welfare services, for children who are receiving foster care services and for children placed with an adult other than their parents and for children with no income who reside in the home of an adult other than their parents, stepparents, or their nonparent relative caretaker. Chapter 8. II. of online policy manual.

    In addition, the state waived co-pays for families impacted by Hurricane Florence in the 34 counties designated by FEMA as Individual Assistance counties. Co-pays were waived for the months of October 2018 through January 2019.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.4: Family Contribution to Payment - Family Contribution to Payment. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Health and Safety

    Child-Staff Ratios by Group Size by Age of Children for Licensed Child Care Centers
    Age of Children Child-Staff Ratio Group Size
    Infant (11 months) 5:1 10
    Toddler (35 months) 10:1 20
    Preschool (59months) 15:1 25
    School-age (6 years) 25:1 25
    School-age (10 years and older) 25:1 25
    If any of the responses above are different for exempt child care centers, describe which requirements apply: Described Below
    Religious sponsored programs are exempt from child care center and family child care home staff qualification requirements; however they are not exempt from the ratio and group size requirements. An administrator of a religious sponsored child care center must be literate and at least 21 years of age. All staff counted toward meeting the required staff/child ratio must be at least 16 years old, provided that persons younger than 18 work under the direct supervision of a literate staff person who is at least 21 years old. Persons operating religious sponsored child care homes must be 18 years old and literate. N.C.G.S. §7-110-106(e)
    Source(s): National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance. (2021). 2020 Child Care Licensing Study: Analysis of child care licensing regulations. [Unpublished data].

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 5.2.1a-5_6_7: Standards on ratios, group sizes, and qualifications for CCDF providers.– exempt child care centers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Quality Improvement

    Use of Quality Funds
    Yes/No CCDF Funds Other Funds Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Supporting accreditation Not available Not available Not available Described Below
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Use of Quality Funds - Continued
    Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce State pre-K and Smart Start
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Not available
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system State funds through Smart Start
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Not available
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards State appropriations
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Not available
    Supporting accreditation NA
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development Not available
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Not available
    Source(s):
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-1: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-2: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-3: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-4: Use of Quality Funds - Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-5: Use of Quality Funds - Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-6: Use of Quality Funds - Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-7: Use of Quality Funds - Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territory. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-8: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting accreditation. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-9: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-10: Use of Quality Funds - Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency
    Application in other languages (application document, brochures, provider notices) Yes
    Informational materials in non-English languages Yes
    Website in non-English languages Yes
    Lead Agency accepts applications at local community-based locations Not available
    Bilingual caseworkers or translators available Yes
    Bilingual outreach workers Yes
    Partnerships with community-based organizations Yes
    Other Yes
    Describe Other Described Below
    The DHHS Title VI Coordinator secures translation services upon request. DHHS has a Spanish interpreter on staff who can help translate/respond to calls and Spanish webmaster questions. DHHS contracts with translator services for languages other than Spanish.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.1-1 and 2.1.1-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families for whom English is not their first language. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with a Person(s) with Disabilities
    Applications and public informational materials available in Braille and other communication formats for access by individuals with disabilities Not available
    Websites that are accessible (e.g., Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act) Yes
    Caseworkers with specialized training/experience in working with individuals with disabilities Not available
    Ensuring accessibility of environments and activities for all children Yes
    Partnerships with state and local programs and associations focused on disability-related topics and issues Yes
    Partnerships with parent associations, support groups, and parent-to-parent support groups, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) federally funded Parent Training and Information Centers Yes
    Partnerships with state and local IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C providers and agencies Yes
    Availability and/or access to specialized services (e.g., mental health, behavioral specialists, therapists) to address the needs of all children Yes
    Other Yes
    Describe Other Described Below
    Provide a Developmental Day license designation for programs meeting additional standards in the NC Child Care Rules.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.2-1 and 2.1.2-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families with a person(s) with a disability. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Consumer Education Website
    How the Lead Agency ensures that its website is consumer-friendly and easily accessible The Division’s newly designed website offers several features which make it consumer friendly and easily accessible. A wide range of users, including parents, providers and the general public will find information needed within a few clicks. Users, whether on a computer, mobile phone, tablet or other device can search for a child care program, review resources, access webmaster email and search an employee directory.

    A significant tool on the consumer education website is the Child Care Facility Search Site. Beginning with a plain language introduction for users on how to use the tool and interpret visit summaries, it proceeds to provide information about specific child care programs to assist families in making decisions about child care, including information on the program's star-rated license and regulatory visit summary information. The search function is robust, so that a user can enter a word and the site bring back results to help them refine their search. Providers can toggle to the Spanish version of the tool.

    The responsive web design has been built from the ground up to accommodate all modern, web-enabled devices; including smartphones, tablets, laptops, desktops, digital projectors and smart TV devices. It provides easy navigation with minimum resizing, panning and scrolling.

    Valuable information can be accessed through the website tabs.

    The Home tab provides links to accessibility tools, assistive technology resources and contact information for the Division and for the Webmaster.

    Under the Parent tab, resources and information can be found on topics such as financial assistance; the Child Care Rules; how to report non-compliance to child care rules and maltreatment; children with special needs; and developmental assessment information. Two consumer education brochures can be found under the Parent tab. One of these titled, “Child Care in North Carolina”, provides information about licensing, the star-rated license, quality child care, steps to finding a child care program and contact information for regional child care child care resource and referral. The second, titled, “Resources for families with young children in North Carolina”, provides resources related to financial assistance, developmental delays, child emotional and social development, and homelessness.

    Child care forms, emergency planning information, a new criminal background check portal, and professional development information can all be accessed under the Provider tab.

    Under both the provider and parent tabs, links are provided for parents, providers and the general public to access other child care related resources. https://ncchildcare.ncdhhs.gov/Provider/Provider-Resources
    https://ncchildcare.ncdhhs.gov/Parents/Additional-Resources
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for families that speak languages other than English The Search for Child Care tool, including the access to the monitoring reports, can be accessed in Spanish. This tool allows families to search for information on a child care program. Most forms and a consumer education brochure can also be viewed and printed in Spanish. A Spanish version of the website will be published during this plan cycle. The individuals who call the Division using the number from the DCDEE website can access translator services for Spanish and other languages for answers to their questions.
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for persons with disabilities The DCDEE website was developed within the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 to ensure accessibility for persons with disabilities.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.3.1, 2.3.1, and 2.3.3: Consumer Education Website. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

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