State and Territory Profile

STATE/TERRITORY PROFILE - MARYLAND

This profile highlights a current innovative effort to promote a subsidy system that is child-focused, family friendly, and fair to providers. It also provides demographic information, Early Care and Education (ECE) program participation and funding, subsidy innovation and program integrity information, program quality improvement activities, and professional development and workforce initiatives. Sources and links are provided at the end of the document

Demographics

Total Population 12 and Under
Total Population 12 and Under. Under 3-Years Old: Total 217560, Percentage 23; 3 and 4-Years Old: Total 146928 Percentage 15; 5 through 12-Years Old: Total 592849 Percentage 62
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (n.d.). In American Community Survey, 2010. QT-P2 Single Years of Age and Sex. Retrieved from American FactFinder: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_SF1_QTP2&prodType=table
Children Living in Working Families
Children Living in Working Families: Children under 6-Years-Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.280446530322154 and with two working parents 0.453392478586396; Children Ages 6 to 17-Years Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.313411606466028 and with two working parents 0.478410839044085
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. B17024: Age By Ratio Of Income To Poverty Level In The Past 12 Months - Universe: Population for whom poverty status is determined. https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=B17024&g=0100000US.04000.001&hidePreview=true&table=B17024&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.B17024&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019&mode=&y=2019
Poverty Statistics
Poverty Statistics: 0.28109921176837 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.121461942068569 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty; 0.248909234845111 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.119528744473082 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty
  Below 100% of Poverty Below 185% of Poverty
Under 6-Years Old 12.15% 28.11%
6 to 17-Years Old 11.95% 24.89%
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. C23008 Age of own Children under 18 Years in Families and Subfamilies by Living Arrangements by Employment Status of Parents: Universe: Own children under 18 years in families and subfamilies.
https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=C23008&g=&hidePreview=false&table=C23008&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.C23008&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019

ECE Program Participation and Funding

Percentage and Number of Children/Families Served
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage
of Children in Care By Age Group
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage<br>of Children in Care By Age Group. Under 3-Years Old: 27%; 3 and 4-Years Old: 28%; 5 through 12-Years Old: 44%
CCDF Average Monthly Number
of Children and Families Served
Average Monthly number of Children and Families Served: Children 18300 and Families 11300
Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 9 Average Monthly Percentages of Children In Care By Age Group https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-9
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates].Table 1 Average Monthly Adjusted Number of Families and Children Served.
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-1
  • Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care
    Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Licensed or Regulated Providers: Center 71%, Group Home 0%, Family Home 26%, Child's Home 26%
    Non-Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Legally Operating Without Regulations: Center 0%, Group Home 0%, Family Home 2%, Child's Home 2%
    Note: Unregulated provider data includes relative and non-relative care.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 6 Average Monthly
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-6
    Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)
    • Total CCDF Expenditure (Including Quality):
    $182,014,743
    • CCDF Federal Expenditure:
    $127,412,231
    • CCDF State/Territory Expenditure:
    $54,602,512
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2021). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2019 (all appropriation years). Table 4a: All expenditures by State- Categorical Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-4a

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2020). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2018 (all appropriation years). Table 3a - All Expenditures by State – Detailed Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-3a
    CCDF Quality Expenditures
    • Total Quality Expenditure:
    $14,735,358
    • Quality Activities (Set Aside Funds):
    $14,735,358
    • Infant and Toddler (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    • Quality Expansion Funds (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    • School-Age/Resource and Referral (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for Child Care
    • TANF – Total Child Care Expenditure:
    $6,026,132
    Bullet icon TANF – Direct Expenditure on Child Care: $6,026,132
    Bullet icon TANF – Transfer to CCDF: Not available
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance. (2020). Fiscal Year 2019 TANF Financial Data. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ofa/resource/tanf-financial-data-fy-2019
    ChildCare Tax Credits
    • Tax Credit Federal Total Amount Claimed:
    $1,658,782
    • Tax Credit Federal Number of Claims:
    784,620
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Available - 2015:
    Yes
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Refundable:
    Yes
    Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)
    • CACFP Funding:
    $50,833,170
    • Number of Family Child Care Homes Participating:
    2,147
    • Number of Child Care Centers (includes Head Start Programs) Participating:
    1,371
    Source(s): Food Research and Action Center. (2020). State of the States: Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) in FY 2019. http://www.frac.org/maps/sos/tables/sos_tab_cacfp.html
    Head Start
    • Head Start Federal Allocation:
    $82,616,955
    • Head Start State/Territory Allocation:
    $1,800,000
    • Number of Children Participating:
    7,630
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2021). The 2020 state of preschool yearbook. http://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/2020
    IDEA Part B, Section 619
    • IDEA Part B Funding:
    $6,874,649
    • Number of Children Served (Ages 3- through 5-Years-Old):
    15,526
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    IDEA Part C
    • IDEA Part C Funding:
    $8,832,580
    • Number of Children Served (Ages Birth through 2-Years-Old):
    9,059
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    Pre-kindergarten
    • Pre-kindergarten Total Expenditure:
    $158,104,001
    • Enrollment (4-year-olds and under):
    33,109
    Note: Total Expenditure includes all State/Territory, Local, and Federal dollars. In addition to 3 and 4-year-olds, some Pre-kindergarten programs enroll children of other ages.
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2021). The 2020 state of preschool yearbook. https://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/yearbook2020

    CCDF Subsidy Program Administration

    Family Percentile Recent MRS
    Income Eligibility at Determination
    (a) (b) (c) (d)
    Family Size100 % of SMI ($/Month) 85% of SMI($/Month)
    [Multiply(a) by 0.85]
    (IF APPLICABLE) ($/Month) Maximum Initial or First Tier Income Limit (or Threshold) if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI IF APPLICABLE) (% of SMI) [Divide(c) by (a), multiply by 100] Income Level if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI
    3 $7,703.00 $6,547.00 $60,081.00 65%
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.1.3 Family Size of 3: Eligible Children and Families - Income Eligibility at Determination. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care
    • Coordinating with Head Start, prekindergarten, or other early learning programs to create a package of arrangements that accommodates parents’ work schedules
    Not available
    • Inquiring about whether the child has an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Individual Family Services Plan (IFSP)
    Not available
    • Establishing minimum eligibility periods greater than 12 months
    Not available
    • Using cross-enrollment or referrals to other public benefits
    Not available
    • Working with IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C staff to explore how services included in a child’s IEP or IFSP can be supported and/or provided onsite and in collaboration with child care services
    Not available
    • Providing more intensive case management for families with children with multiple risk factors;
    Not available
    • Implementing policies and procedures that promote universal design to ensure that activities and environments are accessible to all children, including children with sensory, physical, or other disabilities
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Maryland considers children’s development and learning by not terminating a customer’s child care services and allowing child care vouchers to continue for three months when a parent experiences a temporary cessation of an approved activity. Maryland does not end child care authorization based upon a parent not meeting the eligibility requirements of another eligibility program. Once a child is authorized for child care services, the Maryland Child Care Subsidy is delinked from all other income eligibility programs.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.1.6 and 3.1.6-2: Eligible Children and Families - Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families
    Children with Special Needs
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Yes
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Co-pay is waived for families with a child or parent receiving SSI
    Families with Very Low Incomes
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Yes
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Co-pay is waived for low income families receiving TANF.
    Children Experiencing Homelessness
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Not available
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Not available
    Not available
    Families Receiving TANF*
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Yes
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Parents at risk of becoming dependent on TANF, and where the parent or child is an SSI recipient, are not subject to the Wait List and do not have an assigned co-pay.
    * Includes families receiving TANF program funds, those transitioning off TANF through work activities, or those at risk of becoming dependent on TANF.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.2.2a, 3.2.2b, 3.2.2c, 3.2.2d, 3.2.2a-2, 3.2.2b-2, 3.2.2c-2, and 3.2.2d-2: Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Supply of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Yes
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Yes
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Yes
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Not available
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Not available
    • Other:
    Not available
    Not available
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Quality of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Not available
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Yes
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Yes
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Yes
    • Other:
    Described Below
    MSDE provides funds under the Child Care Quality Incentive Grant to eligible providers located in Title 1 school catchment areas to purchase materials to improve the quality of care.  Judith P. Hoyer Early Child Care and Family Education Centers, known as “Judy Centers,” offer a wide range of services for children age birth through Kindergarten and their low-income families. The goal of Judy Centers is school readiness.   Some of the services Judy Centers offer include: Early childhood education Family activities Health care Adult education Identification of special needs and early Child care Parenting Family literacy.
    Base payment rates and percentiles
    Age Center Percentile of most recent MRS Family Child Care Percentile of most recent MRS
    Infant $ 207.00/ week 42nd $ 156.00/ week 46th
    Toddler $ 207.00/ week 42nd $ 156.00/ week 46th
    Preschool $ 123.00/ week 20th $ 117.00/ week 29th
    School Age $ 123.00/ week 20th $ 117.00/ week 29th
    Effective date of payment rates: 7/1/2018
    Market rate survey (MRS) date: 1/30/2017
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.3.1: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.2.5a: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Tiered Reimbursement or Differential Rates
    • Differential rate for non-traditional hours. Describe
    Yes
    • Differential rate for children with special needs, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Differential rate for infants and toddlers. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for infants/toddlers with no separate bonus or add-on
    Not available
    • Differential rate for school-age programs. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for school-age children with no separate bonus or add-on.
    Not available
    • Differential rate for higher quality, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Other differential rates or tiered rates.
    Not available
    • Tiered or differential rates are not implemented.
    Not available
    CCDF Co-Payemts by Family Size
    CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size
    (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f)
    Family Size Lowest “Entry” Income Level Where Family Is First Charged Co-Pay (Greater Than $0) What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (a)? The Co-Payment in Column (b) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (a)? Highest “Entry” Income Level Before a Family Is No Longer Eligible What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (d)? The Co-Payment in Column (e) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (d)?
    3   $1.00  $5.15 1 $60,081.00 $51.52 2
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.1a Family Size of 3: Family Contribution to Payment - CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Family Contribution to Payment
    • No, the Lead Agency does not waive family contributions/co-payments.
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families with an income at or below the Federal poverty level for families of the same size.
    Yes
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services, as determined by the Lead Agency for purposes of CCDF eligibility. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation..
    Not available
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for other criteria established by the Lead Agency. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation
    Yes
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for other criteria (See table below)
    Described Below
    MSDE does not include TANF and SSI amounts when calculating the family’s gross household income.

    COMAR 13A.06.02.28 c. (i-xxvi)
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.4: Family Contribution to Payment - Family Contribution to Payment. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Health and Safety

    Child-Staff Ratios by Group Size by Age of Children for Licensed Child Care Centers
    Age of Children Child-Staff Ratio Group Size
    Infant (11 months) 3:1 6
    Toddler (35 months) 6:1 12
    Preschool (59months) 10:1 20
    School-age (6 years) 15:1 30
    School-age (10 years and older) 15:1 30
    If any of the responses above are different for exempt child care centers, describe which requirements apply: Described Below
    Maryland does not have exempt child care centers.
    Source(s): National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance. (2021). 2020 Child Care Licensing Study: Analysis of child care licensing regulations. [Unpublished data].

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 5.2.1a-5_6_7: Standards on ratios, group sizes, and qualifications for CCDF providers.– exempt child care centers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Quality Improvement

    Use of Quality Funds
    Yes/No CCDF Funds Other Funds Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services Yes Yes Yes State general funds are combined with CCDF funds to support the Maryland Child Care Resource and Referral Network.
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Supporting accreditation Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Use of Quality Funds - Continued
    Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce Kellogg Foundation Maryland general funds Preschool Development Grant
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Maryland general funds.
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system Not available
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Maryland general funds.
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards Maryland general funds are combined with CCDF funds to support child care licensing specialists, monitoring, and training activities.
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Not available
    Supporting accreditation Maryland general funds.
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development Maryland general funds.
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Maryland general funds.
    Source(s):
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-1: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-2: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-3: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-4: Use of Quality Funds - Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-5: Use of Quality Funds - Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-6: Use of Quality Funds - Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-7: Use of Quality Funds - Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territory. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-8: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting accreditation. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-9: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-10: Use of Quality Funds - Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency
    Application in other languages (application document, brochures, provider notices) Not available
    Informational materials in non-English languages Not available
    Website in non-English languages Not available
    Lead Agency accepts applications at local community-based locations Not available
    Bilingual caseworkers or translators available Not available
    Bilingual outreach workers Not available
    Partnerships with community-based organizations Not available
    Other Yes
    Describe Other Described Below
    The Division of Early Childhood's microsite (http://earlychildhood.marylandpublicschools.org) is a responsive website that provides information on a number of early childhood topics in HTML format to allow for translation with the website’s Google translator. The site translates content from English to 11 other languages including Arabic, Simplified and Traditional Chinese, French, German, Hindi, Italian, Korean, Russian, Spanish and Vietnamese. Interpretation services are available for phone calls and orientation sessions.

    The Maryland Child Care Resource and Referral Network has access to a Language Line Telephone interpretation service that is available for non-English speakers. They also provide statewide counseling services via a 1-800 telephone line. An on-site Spanish speaking referral specialist is available for Spanish speakers. Voicemail and email are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

    MSDE is in the beginning stages of translating licensing forms into Spanish and will determine the other most common languages spoken in Maryland after the Spanish translations are complete.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.1-1 and 2.1.1-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families for whom English is not their first language. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with a Person(s) with Disabilities
    Applications and public informational materials available in Braille and other communication formats for access by individuals with disabilities Yes
    Websites that are accessible (e.g., Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act) Yes
    Caseworkers with specialized training/experience in working with individuals with disabilities Not available
    Ensuring accessibility of environments and activities for all children Not available
    Partnerships with state and local programs and associations focused on disability-related topics and issues Yes
    Partnerships with parent associations, support groups, and parent-to-parent support groups, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) federally funded Parent Training and Information Centers Not available
    Partnerships with state and local IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C providers and agencies Yes
    Availability and/or access to specialized services (e.g., mental health, behavioral specialists, therapists) to address the needs of all children Yes
    Other Yes
    Describe Other Described Below
    Maryland Family Network assists with outreach and services to eligible families who have children with disabilities. That service, LOCATE: Child Care enables families to find child care programs specifically geared toward children with special needs, either via telephone or online.

    MSDE also partners with the Department of Human Services, the Developmental Disabilities Council (http://www.md-council.org/), Maryland Family Network, the Maryland Child Care Resource and Referral Network, and community based organizations to reach eligible persons with disabilities through the disbursement of information via print media, in-person presentations, and interviews (phone and in-person). The Maryland Child Care Resource and Referral Network employs referral specialists with special needs backgrounds. These specialists are available to assist families with children with disabilities birth through 21 years of age. Voicemail and email are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

    Through the Medically Fragile Children Birth to Five grant, PACT: Helping Children with Special Needs – World of Care, PACT, Helping Children with Special Needs – Therapeutic Nursery, The Arc of Montgomery County, The Arc of Prince George’s County, and The Reginald S. Lourie Center programs provide medically-based child care and early education services to children with medical diagnoses and those who have developmental delays, physical disabilities, and behavioral issues requiring specialized care.

    Abilities Network delivers comprehensive statewide technical assistance and training for caregivers who are providing care services to special needs children, birth through three (3) years of age.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.2-1 and 2.1.2-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families with a person(s) with a disability. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Consumer Education Website
    How the Lead Agency ensures that its website is consumer-friendly and easily accessible The Division of Early Childhood microsite provides users with multiple ways to locate information, including a search bar, main menu bar, side bar menus, and hyperlinked text. Users can find information based on their role (family, provider, educator, partner, etc.…). The Division of Early Childhood is making plans to combine the Consumer Education website with the Maryland Families Engage website currently in development to increase family access to State and national resources.
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for families that speak languages other than English The Division of Early Childhood's microsite provides information on a number of early childhood topics in HTML format to allow for translation with the website’s Google translator.  The site translates content from English to 11 other languages including Arabic, Simplified and Traditional Chinese, French, German, Hindi, Italian, Korean, Russian, Spanish and Vietnamese.  Interpretation services are available for phone calls and orientation sessions.
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for persons with disabilities The Office of Child Care has contracted with a website developer to redesign the Division and Consumer Education websites. The new websites will be 508 compliant to ensure they are accessible to individuals with disabilities. The sites will use alt-tags on photos, embed readable PDF documents, and provide content that opens as a hyperlink so that screen readers and other tools or aids can easily communicate with the person with special needs. The work is anticipated to be completed by September 30, 2018.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.3.1, 2.3.1, and 2.3.3: Consumer Education Website. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

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