.

State and Territory Profile

STATE/TERRITORY PROFILE - MASSACHUSETTS

This profile highlights a current innovative effort to promote a subsidy system that is child-focused, family friendly, and fair to providers. It also provides demographic information, Early Care and Education (ECE) program participation and funding, subsidy innovation and program integrity information, program quality improvement activities, and professional development and workforce initiatives. Sources and links are provided at the end of the document

Demographics

Total Population 12 and Under
Total Population 12 and Under. Under 3-Years Old: Total 217691, Percentage 22; 3 and 4-Years Old: Total 149396 Percentage 15; 5 through 12-Years Old: Total 626404 Percentage 63
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (n.d.). In American Community Survey, 2010. QT-P2 Single Years of Age and Sex. Retrieved from American FactFinder: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_SF1_QTP2&prodType=table
Children Living in Working Families
Children Living in Working Families: Children under 6-Years-Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.243132283847409 and with two working parents 0.500133955814427; Children Ages 6 to 17-Years Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.276038183255305 and with two working parents 0.504642296580036
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. B17024: Age By Ratio Of Income To Poverty Level In The Past 12 Months - Universe: Population for whom poverty status is determined. https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=B17024&g=0100000US.04000.001&hidePreview=true&table=B17024&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.B17024&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019&mode=&y=2019
Poverty Statistics
Poverty Statistics: 0.24456428466107 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.121450619895141 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty; 0.234178066095739 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.113908305415435 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty
  Below 100% of Poverty Below 185% of Poverty
Under 6-Years Old 12.15% 24.46%
6 to 17-Years Old 11.39% 23.42%
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. C23008 Age of own Children under 18 Years in Families and Subfamilies by Living Arrangements by Employment Status of Parents: Universe: Own children under 18 years in families and subfamilies.
https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=C23008&g=&hidePreview=false&table=C23008&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.C23008&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019

ECE Program Participation and Funding

Percentage and Number of Children/Families Served
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage
of Children in Care By Age Group
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage<br>of Children in Care By Age Group. Under 3-Years Old: 26%; 3 and 4-Years Old: 29%; 5 through 12-Years Old: 45%
CCDF Average Monthly Number
of Children and Families Served
Average Monthly number of Children and Families Served: Children 29200 and Families 20100
Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 9 Average Monthly Percentages of Children In Care By Age Group https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-9
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates].Table 1 Average Monthly Adjusted Number of Families and Children Served.
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-1
  • Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care
    Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Licensed or Regulated Providers: Center 75%, Group Home 21%, Family Home 2%, Child's Home 2%
    Non-Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Legally Operating Without Regulations: Center 0%, Group Home 0%, Family Home 1%, Child's Home 1%
    Note: Unregulated provider data includes relative and non-relative care.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 6 Average Monthly
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-6
    Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)
    • Total CCDF Expenditure (Including Quality):
    $283,168,963
    • CCDF Federal Expenditure:
    $207,430,859
    • CCDF State/Territory Expenditure:
    $75,738,104
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2020). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2018 (all appropriation years). Table 4a: All expenditures by State- Categorical Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-4a

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2020). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2018 (all appropriation years). Table 3a - All Expenditures by State – Detailed Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-3a
    CCDF Quality Expenditures
    • Total Quality Expenditure:
    $38,576,959
    • Quality Activities (Set Aside Funds):
    $38,576,959
    • Infant and Toddler (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    • Quality Expansion Funds (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    • School-Age/Resource and Referral (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for Child Care
    • TANF – Total Child Care Expenditure:
    $289,802,588
    Bullet icon TANF – Direct Expenditure on Child Care: $198,232,364
    Bullet icon TANF – Transfer to CCDF: $91,570,224
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance. (2020). Fiscal Year 2019 TANF Financial Data. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ofa/resource/tanf-financial-data-fy-2019
    ChildCare Tax Credits
    • Tax Credit Federal Total Amount Claimed:
    $1,765,054
    • Tax Credit Federal Number of Claims:
    802,450
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Available - 2015:
    Yes
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Refundable:
    No
    Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)
    • CACFP Funding:
    $62,154,451
    • Number of Family Child Care Homes Participating:
    2,667
    • Number of Child Care Centers (includes Head Start Programs) Participating:
    835
    Source(s): Food Research and Action Center. (2020). State of the States: Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) in FY 2019. http://www.frac.org/maps/sos/tables/sos_tab_cacfp.html
    Head Start
    • Head Start Federal Allocation:
    $116,497,665
    • Head Start State/Territory Allocation:
    $9,600,000
    • Number of Children Participating:
    9,716
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2020). The 2019 state of preschool yearbook. http://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/2019-2
    IDEA Part B, Section 619
    • IDEA Part B Funding:
    $10,212,062
    • Number of Children Served (Ages 3- through 5-Years-Old):
    18,906
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    IDEA Part C
    • IDEA Part C Funding:
    $8,228,368
    • Number of Children Served (Ages Birth through 2-Years-Old):
    22,541
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    Pre-kindergarten
    • Pre-kindergarten Total Expenditure:
    $105,778,125
    • Enrollment (4-year-olds and under):
    33,636
    Note: Total Expenditure includes all State/Territory, Local, and Federal dollars. In addition to 3 and 4-year-olds, some Pre-kindergarten programs enroll children of other ages.
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2021). The 2020 state of preschool yearbook. https://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/yearbook2020

    CCDF Subsidy Program Administration

    Family Percentile Recent MRS
    Income Eligibility at Determination
    (a) (b) (c) (d)
    Family Size100 % of SMI ($/Month) 85% of SMI($/Month)
    [Multiply(a) by 0.85]
    (IF APPLICABLE) ($/Month) Maximum Initial or First Tier Income Limit (or Threshold) if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI IF APPLICABLE) (% of SMI) [Divide(c) by (a), multiply by 100] Income Level if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI
    3 $7,967.00 $6,772.00 $3,984.00 50%
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.1.3 Family Size of 3: Eligible Children and Families - Income Eligibility at Determination. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care
    • Coordinating with Head Start, prekindergarten, or other early learning programs to create a package of arrangements that accommodates parents’ work schedules
    Yes
    • Inquiring about whether the child has an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Individual Family Services Plan (IFSP)
    Yes
    • Establishing minimum eligibility periods greater than 12 months
    Not available
    • Using cross-enrollment or referrals to other public benefits
    Yes
    • Working with IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C staff to explore how services included in a child’s IEP or IFSP can be supported and/or provided onsite and in collaboration with child care services
    Not available
    • Providing more intensive case management for families with children with multiple risk factors;
    Yes
    • Implementing policies and procedures that promote universal design to ensure that activities and environments are accessible to all children, including children with sensory, physical, or other disabilities
    Yes
    • Other:
    Not available
    Not available
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.1.6 and 3.1.6-2: Eligible Children and Families - Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families
    Children with Special Needs
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Not available
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    EEC provides funding upon request for assistance to children with special needs, including the funding of one-on-one aides. EEC also allows children with special needs to remain in care up to the age of 16.
    Families with Very Low Incomes
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Not available
    • Waive co-payments
    Yes
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Yes
    • Other:
    Described Below
    To ensure child care subsidies are prioritized for families with very low incomes, EEC has implemented a tiered eligibility system that limits entry to the subsidy system for families at or below 50% of the SMI. In addition, EEC prioritizes access to child care financial assistance for specific vulnerable low income populations through its system of statewide contracts, which aim to increase access for children of teen parents and children of families receiving protective services through the DCF. In addition parent fees may be waived for families with open protective services cases from DCF and families with open TAFDC cash benefit cases through DTA and families with low incomes.
    Children Experiencing Homelessness
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Yes
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Effective October 1, 2018, EEC implemented interim policies establishing the McKinney-Vento definition of homelessness. EEC will continue to allow homeless families to access care in accordance with its homeless contracts that allows households who are in DHCD or DCF shelters immediate access to care. Under EEC’s proposed regulatory changes, EEC will expand access for homeless families by allowing all families who meet the McKinney-Vento definition to use homelessness as a service need in lieu of employment, education, or training. EEC will also waive the asset limit for homeless families. EEC will only allow the use homelessness as a service need for two years and any extensions beyond the two years would be evaluated by EEC on a case by case basis. These changes would not guarantee all homeless families immediate access to care but some enrollment prioritization would continue through the existing homeless contracts. EEC anticipates that the regulatory changes will take effect in early 2019.
    Families Receiving TANF*
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Yes
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Massachusetts law, through the state budget, requires that subsidized early education and care shall be available to (a) recipients of transitional aid to families with dependent children benefits; (b) former participants who are working for up to 1 year after termination of their benefits; (c) participants who are working for up to 1 year after the transitional period; and (d) parents who are under 18 years of age who are currently enrolled in a job training program and who would qualify for benefits under chapter 118 of the General Laws but for the consideration of the grandparents’ income. EEC is required to serve all children referred by DTA under category (a) above. Under EEC regulations, families transitioning off of TANF benefits, categories (b) and (c) listed above, are required to meet service need requirements and be below 85% of the SMI.
    * Includes families receiving TANF program funds, those transitioning off TANF through work activities, or those at risk of becoming dependent on TANF.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.2.2a, 3.2.2b, 3.2.2c, 3.2.2d, 3.2.2a-2, 3.2.2b-2, 3.2.2c-2, and 3.2.2d-2: Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Supply of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Yes
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Yes
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Yes
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Yes
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Yes
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Yes
    • Other:
    Not available
    Not available
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Quality of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Yes
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Yes
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Yes
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Yes
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Yes
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Yes
    • Other:
    Not available
    Not available
    Base payment rates and percentiles
    Age Center Percentile of most recent MRS Family Child Care Percentile of most recent MRS
    Infant $ 65.00/ day 5.3 $ 44.07/ day 56.1
    Toddler $ 59.47/ day 9.1 $ 44.07/ day 65.9
    Preschool $ 42.18/ day 14.8 $ 35.07/ day 47.9
    School Age $ 37.56/ day 22.8 $ 35.07/ day 51
    Effective date of payment rates: 7/1/2018
    Market rate survey (MRS) date: 6/30/2018
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.3.1: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.2.5a: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Tiered Reimbursement or Differential Rates
    • Differential rate for non-traditional hours. Describe
    Not available
    • Differential rate for children with special needs, as defined by the state/territory.
    Not available
    • Differential rate for infants and toddlers. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for infants/toddlers with no separate bonus or add-on
    Yes
    • Differential rate for school-age programs. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for school-age children with no separate bonus or add-on.
    Not available
    • Differential rate for higher quality, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Other differential rates or tiered rates.
    Yes
    • Tiered or differential rates are not implemented.
    Not available
    CCDF Co-Payemts by Family Size
    CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size
    (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f)
    Family Size Lowest “Entry” Income Level Where Family Is First Charged Co-Pay (Greater Than $0) What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (a)? The Co-Payment in Column (b) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (a)? Highest “Entry” Income Level Before a Family Is No Longer Eligible What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (d)? The Co-Payment in Column (e) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (d)?
    3 $1,181.00 $43.30 3.6 $6,925.00 $887.65 13
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.1a Family Size of 3: Family Contribution to Payment - CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Family Contribution to Payment
    • No, the Lead Agency does not waive family contributions/co-payments.
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families with an income at or below the Federal poverty level for families of the same size.
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services, as determined by the Lead Agency for purposes of CCDF eligibility. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation..
    Not available
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for other criteria established by the Lead Agency. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation
    Yes
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for other criteria (See table below)
    Described Below
    The following categories are exempt from co-payments: 1. DTA authorized families with open TAFDC cases; 2. Foster parents, guardians, or caretakers; 3. DCF authorized families with open cases (only at the discretion of DCF); and 4. families at the lowest income levels, currently at or below $1,180 per month for a family of three. 

    https://www.mass.gov/guides/child-care-subsidy-management-and-ccfa
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.4: Family Contribution to Payment - Family Contribution to Payment. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Health and Safety

    Child-Staff Ratios by Group Size by Age of Children for Licensed Child Care Centers
    Age of Children Child-Staff Ratio Group Size
    Infant (11 months) 3:1 7
    Toddler (35 months) 10:1 20
    Preschool (59months) 10:1 20
    School-age (6 years) 15:1 30
    School-age (10 years and older) 15:1 30
    If any of the responses above are different for exempt child care centers, describe which requirements apply: Described Below
    For DPH regulated summer camps, the following ratios are required: residential and day camps shall have at least one supervisory staff person for every ten campers over the age of six. There shall be one supervisory staff person for every five campers age six or under. Junior counselors may be included in meeting up to one half of the camper/staff ratio within each unit, living or general activity group, but only if they have received training and supervision to verify their ability to handle camper groups independently. See 105 CMR 430.101. For license exempt public school afterschool programs, schools are expected to follow local requirements; however, the recommended ratio is 1:13, which is identical to EEC's school age ratio requirement.
    Source(s): National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance. (2021). 2020 Child Care Licensing Study: Analysis of child care licensing regulations. [Unpublished data].

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 5.2.1a-5_6_7: Standards on ratios, group sizes, and qualifications for CCDF providers.– exempt child care centers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Quality Improvement

    Use of Quality Funds
    Yes/No CCDF Funds Other Funds Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services Yes Yes Yes Massachusetts General Funds
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Supporting accreditation Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Not available Not available Not available Not available
    Use of Quality Funds - Continued
    Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce Massachusetts General Funds
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Massachusetts General Funds
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system Massachusetts General Funds
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Massachusetts General Funds
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards Massachusetts General Funds
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Massachusetts General Funds
    Supporting accreditation Massachusetts General Funds
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development Massachusetts General Funds
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Not available
    Source(s):
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-1: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-2: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-3: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-4: Use of Quality Funds - Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-5: Use of Quality Funds - Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-6: Use of Quality Funds - Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-7: Use of Quality Funds - Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territory. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-8: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting accreditation. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-9: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-10: Use of Quality Funds - Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency
    Application in other languages (application document, brochures, provider notices) Yes
    Informational materials in non-English languages Yes
    Website in non-English languages Yes
    Lead Agency accepts applications at local community-based locations Yes
    Bilingual caseworkers or translators available Yes
    Bilingual outreach workers Yes
    Partnerships with community-based organizations Yes
    Other Yes
    Describe Other Described Below
    EEC has partnered with WIDA to offer online  training modules for early educators who work with children who are English language learners, ages 2.5 to 5.5 years old.  WIDA is a national organization that advances academic language development and achievement for children and youth who are culturally and linguistically diverse through high quality standards, assessments, research, and professional learning for educators. The English language learner training modules provide opportunities for early educators to learn new instructional content and apply it to practice . As part of the WIDA model, resources like “ABCs of Family Engagement: Key Considerations for Building Relationships with Families and Strengthening Family Engagement Practices,” are available for early childhood educators to build on their overall effectiveness with families. Also, many subsidy administrators working directly with families have bilingual staff in the primary language of their clients to provide services in the family's native language. When there is no bilingual staff present, EEC staff and subsidy administrators have access to telephonic translation services to better serve families whose first language is not English. EEC has worked with the Massachusetts Office of Refugees and Immigrants to create the list of most common spoken languages for our subsidy families and, subject to available funding, EEC has dedicated resources for the translation of documents into these primary languages.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.1-1 and 2.1.1-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families for whom English is not their first language. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with a Person(s) with Disabilities
    Applications and public informational materials available in Braille and other communication formats for access by individuals with disabilities Not available
    Websites that are accessible (e.g., Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act) Yes
    Caseworkers with specialized training/experience in working with individuals with disabilities Not available
    Ensuring accessibility of environments and activities for all children Yes
    Partnerships with state and local programs and associations focused on disability-related topics and issues Yes
    Partnerships with parent associations, support groups, and parent-to-parent support groups, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) federally funded Parent Training and Information Centers Not available
    Partnerships with state and local IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C providers and agencies Yes
    Availability and/or access to specialized services (e.g., mental health, behavioral specialists, therapists) to address the needs of all children Yes
    Other Yes
    Describe Other Described Below
    EEC provides families with information to other available human service programs in a variety of ways, through the Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies, Mass211, and EEC's network of Coordinated Family and Community Engagement grantees across the Commonwealth. In addition to providing all of the information about child care options, they may provide information on additional comprehensive supports, such as adult basic education, local and state agencies responsible for subsidized housing, shelter programs, etc. Referrals to families are provided to/from the entities within this network of agencies as well, ensuring that families are connected to the best resources to meet their needs. Partners include all of the entities listed above as well as, Early Intervention, DESE, DPH, the DMH, DTA, DCF, and the Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.  Information may be provided in-person, via telephone, through online resources, or in printed materials.  Parents with disabilities are also included with the Commonwealth's definition of "protective services", as a result, parents with disabilities may qualify for CCDF child care subsidies without participating in an approved activity for up to two years upon approval by EEC. Early Childhood Mental Health (ECMH) consultation programs provide consultation and coaching services to address and support the social-emotional development and behavioral health of children in early education and care and out-of-school time settings. The early childhood mental health consultation services funded by the Department of Early Education and Care's (EEC) Mental Health Consultation Grant are available state-wide and may be accessed by the entire mixed delivery system, including children receiving CCDF. ECMH consultants also provide support and guidance to programs, educators, and families to address the developmental, emotional, and behavioral challenges of infants and young children to ensure healthy social-emotional development, reduce the suspension and expulsion rate in early education and care settings, and promote school success. EEC established a dedicated webpage for families, providers and the general public to obtain information on ECMH: www.mass.gov/eec/ecmh. This website describes the scope of ECMH services available, as well as a listing of the current ECMH grantees and resources. The consultation services offered through the FY2018 Mental Health Consultation Grant include mental health supports, strategies, and services that address the developmental, emotional, and behavioral challenges of infants and young children and their families to promote school success, ensure healthy social-emotional development, and reduce the suspension and expulsion rate in early education and care settings. Furthermore, the child care licensing regulations establish requirements related to requests for reasonable accommodations for any child enrolled in an early education program subject to EEC licensure.  For children receiving CCDF with special needs/disabilities, EEC has limited flexible funding available on a first come, first served, case-by-case basis to provide temporary financial support to programs to successfully transition and include a subsidized child with disabilities/special needs. Appropriate fund use may include: consultation to identify necessary supports for the child, training for program staff, specialized equipment, or a temporary aide position to enhance staffing. EEC considers this funding as a temporary and preparatory step and expects a program to integrate any funded accommodations into its regular practice, in order to enhance the program's ability to better meet the child's needs. Through funding from DESE and an Interagency Service Agreement from EEC to DPH’s Regional Consultation Program (RCPs,) resources are available to families to facilitate transitions from Early Intervention to Early Education and Care Programs and to support children eligible for Special Education Services. In addition, the RCPs support children with disabilities and their families who participate in Early Education and Care programs in an ongoing way.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.2-1 and 2.1.2-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families with a person(s) with a disability. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Consumer Education Website
    How the Lead Agency ensures that its website is consumer-friendly and easily accessible In October 2017, Governor Charlie Baker’s administration launched a new website for state agencies under the Mass.gov domain. EEC elected to participate in the pilot of the new website. The new mass.gov platform was designed to better serve constituent needs in the digital age. The framework and page layout design was developed through pilot tests, user research and public feedback. The new mass.gov website works well with both high-speed connections and pay-as-you go wireless data plans, and has better functionality on more devices than the previous version. New standards on the site make search results richer, including information like addresses, phone numbers and hours of operation. When the new website was in the development stage, it was tested by users from urban, suburban, and rural areas from every part of Massachusetts, and hundreds of users provided feedback to user experience researchers through over a dozen tests. The new Mass.gov is continually being improved through dashboards that give the Executive Office of Technology Services and Security continuous feedback from constituents on how web content performs. The URL for EEC’s new website is: https://www.mass.gov/orgs/department-of-early-education-and-care, and the URL for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’ new website is: https://www.mass.gov.
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for families that speak languages other than English The new https://www.mass.gov website has a Google translator button at the top of all web pages, including EEC’s web pages, whereby users can translate the page content into 12 different languages (Arabic, Chinese, French, Haitian Creole, Italian, Khmer, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese.) In addition, EEC has translated a number of important documents for parents, programs/providers, and the public who may speak languages other than English.
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for persons with disabilities EEC's website follows specific Commonwealth enterprise standards designed to meet the needs of persons with disabilities. The Commonwealth enterprise standards are generally based on standards used by the federal government for technology accessibility for people with disabilities, as well as web content accessibility guidelines developed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Mass.gov is regularly tested using leading web accessibility technologies and reviewed by users to verify that the website is compliant with applicable standards.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.3.1, 2.3.1, and 2.3.3: Consumer Education Website. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Footnotes

    Click to show footnotes