.

State and Territory Profile

STATE/TERRITORY PROFILE - DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

This profile highlights a current innovative effort to promote a subsidy system that is child-focused, family friendly, and fair to providers. It also provides demographic information, Early Care and Education (ECE) program participation and funding, subsidy innovation and program integrity information, program quality improvement activities, and professional development and workforce initiatives. Sources and links are provided at the end of the document

Demographics

Total Population 12 and Under
Total Population 12 and Under. Under 3-Years Old: Total 20551, Percentage 28; 3 and 4-Years Old: Total 12062 Percentage 16; 5 through 12-Years Old: Total 41001 Percentage 56
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (n.d.). In American Community Survey, 2010. QT-P2 Single Years of Age and Sex. Retrieved from American FactFinder: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_SF1_QTP2&prodType=table
Children Living in Working Families
Children Living in Working Families: Children under 6-Years-Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.366336054872464 and with two working parents 0.44985288099924; Children Ages 6 to 17-Years Old Living in Working Families with one working parent 0.520917219327333 and with two working parents 0.293048318332544
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. B17024: Age By Ratio Of Income To Poverty Level In The Past 12 Months - Universe: Population for whom poverty status is determined. https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=B17024&g=0100000US.04000.001&hidePreview=true&table=B17024&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.B17024&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019&mode=&y=2019
Poverty Statistics
Poverty Statistics: 0.269298064079168 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.181626625025869 are Under 6-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty; 0.346022416621104 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 185% of Poverty; 0.195147621651175 are 6 to 17-Years Old and living Below 100% of Poverty
  Below 100% of Poverty Below 185% of Poverty
Under 6-Years Old 18.16% 26.93%
6 to 17-Years Old 19.51% 34.6%
Source(s): U.S. Census Bureau. (2020). In American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, 2019. C23008 Age of own Children under 18 Years in Families and Subfamilies by Living Arrangements by Employment Status of Parents: Universe: Own children under 18 years in families and subfamilies.
https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=C23008&g=&hidePreview=false&table=C23008&tid=ACSDT1Y2019.C23008&lastDisplayedRow=17&vintage=2019

ECE Program Participation and Funding

Percentage and Number of Children/Families Served
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage
of Children in Care By Age Group
CCDF Average Monthly Percentage<br>of Children in Care By Age Group. Under 3-Years Old: 47%; 3 and 4-Years Old: 27%; 5 through 12-Years Old: 25%
CCDF Average Monthly Number
of Children and Families Served
Average Monthly number of Children and Families Served: Children 1500 and Families 1200
Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 9 Average Monthly Percentages of Children In Care By Age Group https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-9
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates].Table 1 Average Monthly Adjusted Number of Families and Children Served.
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-1
  • Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care
    Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Licensed or Regulated Providers: Center 96%, Group Home 0%, Family Home 2%, Child's Home 2%
    Non-Licensed Providers
    Average Monthly Percentages of Children Served in All Types of Care - Legally Operating Without Regulations: Center 0%, Group Home 0%, Family Home 0%, Child's Home 0%
    Note: Unregulated provider data includes relative and non-relative care.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Care. (2020). FFY 2019 CCDF data tables [Preliminary estimates]. Table 6 Average Monthly
    https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/data/fy-2019-preliminary-data-table-6
    Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)
    • Total CCDF Expenditure (Including Quality):
    $18,912,045
    • CCDF Federal Expenditure:
    $13,097,245
    • CCDF State/Territory Expenditure:
    $5,814,800
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2020). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2018 (all appropriation years). Table 4a: All expenditures by State- Categorical Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-4a

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2020). CCDF Expenditures for FY 2018 (all appropriation years). Table 3a - All Expenditures by State – Detailed Summary. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/fy-2018-ccdf-table-3a
    CCDF Quality Expenditures
    • Total Quality Expenditure:
    $6,701,022
    • Quality Activities (Set Aside Funds):
    $7,634,551
    • Infant and Toddler (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    • Quality Expansion Funds (Targeted Funds):
    $-933,529
    • School-Age/Resource and Referral (Targeted Funds):
    Not available
    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for Child Care
    • TANF – Total Child Care Expenditure:
    $36,947,695
    Bullet icon TANF – Direct Expenditure on Child Care: $36,947,695
    Bullet icon TANF – Transfer to CCDF: Not available
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance. (2020). Fiscal Year 2019 TANF Financial Data. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ofa/resource/tanf-financial-data-fy-2019
    ChildCare Tax Credits
    • Tax Credit Federal Total Amount Claimed:
    $108,829
    • Tax Credit Federal Number of Claims:
    61,190
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Available - 2015:
    Yes
    • State/Territory Tax Credit Refundable:
    No
    Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)
    • CACFP Funding:
    $10,248,217
    • Number of Family Child Care Homes Participating:
    43
    • Number of Child Care Centers (includes Head Start Programs) Participating:
    260
    Source(s): Food Research and Action Center. (2020). State of the States: Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) in FY 2019. http://www.frac.org/maps/sos/tables/sos_tab_cacfp.html
    Head Start
    • Head Start Federal Allocation:
    $15,623,618
    • Head Start State/Territory Allocation:
    Not available
    • Number of Children Participating:
    2,150
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2020). The 2019 state of preschool yearbook. http://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/2019-2
    IDEA Part B, Section 619
    • IDEA Part B Funding:
    $256,660
    • Number of Children Served (Ages 3- through 5-Years-Old):
    2,146
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    IDEA Part C
    • IDEA Part C Funding:
    $2,843,044
    • Number of Children Served (Ages Birth through 2-Years-Old):
    979
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Education. (2021). Fiscal Years 2019-2021 State Tables for the U.S. Department of Education. https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
    Pre-kindergarten
    • Pre-kindergarten Total Expenditure:
    $255,918,562
    • Enrollment (4-year-olds and under):
    13,791
    Note: Total Expenditure includes all State/Territory, Local, and Federal dollars. In addition to 3 and 4-year-olds, some Pre-kindergarten programs enroll children of other ages.
    Source(s): National Institute for Early Education Research. (2021). The 2020 state of preschool yearbook. https://nieer.org/state-preschool-yearbooks/yearbook2020

    CCDF Subsidy Program Administration

    Family Percentile Recent MRS
    Income Eligibility at Determination
    (a) (b) (c) (d)
    Family Size100 % of SMI ($/Month) 85% of SMI($/Month)
    [Multiply(a) by 0.85]
    (IF APPLICABLE) ($/Month) Maximum Initial or First Tier Income Limit (or Threshold) if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI IF APPLICABLE) (% of SMI) [Divide(c) by (a), multiply by 100] Income Level if Lower Than 85% of Current SMI
    3 $6,762.00 $5,748.00 $4,254.00 62% 
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.1.3 Family Size of 3: Eligible Children and Families - Income Eligibility at Determination. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care
    • Coordinating with Head Start, prekindergarten, or other early learning programs to create a package of arrangements that accommodates parents’ work schedules
    Yes
    • Inquiring about whether the child has an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Individual Family Services Plan (IFSP)
    Yes
    • Establishing minimum eligibility periods greater than 12 months
    Not available
    • Using cross-enrollment or referrals to other public benefits
    Yes
    • Working with IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C staff to explore how services included in a child’s IEP or IFSP can be supported and/or provided onsite and in collaboration with child care services
    Yes
    • Providing more intensive case management for families with children with multiple risk factors;
    Not available
    • Implementing policies and procedures that promote universal design to ensure that activities and environments are accessible to all children, including children with sensory, physical, or other disabilities
    Yes
    • Other:
    Described Below
    OSSE uses locally appropriated child care subsidy funds to support Early Head Start child care partners who are part of the Quality Improvement Network.These child development facilities receive an increased daily reimbursement rate to provide continuous, comprehensive and intensive high quality care that meets Head Start Performance Standards.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.1.6 and 3.1.6-2: Eligible Children and Families - Approaches Used for Promoting Continuity of Care. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families
    Children with Special Needs
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Applicant parents of children with special needs are waived of the requirements to participate in a qualifying activity (e.g. training or employment). Applicants are still required to meet the income threshold requirements but expenses attributed to caring for a child with special needs is a deductible expense from the income determination. Per 45 CFR 98.20(a)(3)(ii), the District has identified children with special needs as part of the vulnerable population.
    Families with Very Low Incomes
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Yes
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Not available
    Not available
    Children Experiencing Homelessness
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Yes
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Applicant parents of children experiencing homelessness are waived of the requirement to participate in a qualifying activity and income threshold requirements. Eligibility staff does not calculate income to determine eligibility or co-payment.
    Families Receiving TANF*
    • Prioritize for enrollment
    Yes
    • Serve without placing these populations on waiting lists
    Yes
    • Waive co-payments
    Not available
    • Pay higher rates for access to higher quality care
    Not available
    • Use grants or contracts to reserve slots for priority populations
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    Effective October 1, 2016, TANF applicants are eligible for child care services with evidence of acceptance and approval of the applicant’s Individual Responsibility Plan.
    * Includes families receiving TANF program funds, those transitioning off TANF through work activities, or those at risk of becoming dependent on TANF.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 3.2.2a, 3.2.2b, 3.2.2c, 3.2.2d, 3.2.2a-2, 3.2.2b-2, 3.2.2c-2, and 3.2.2d-2: Increasing Access for Vulnerable Children and Families. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Supply of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Not available
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Not available
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    There are no descriptions needed.
    Use of Grants or Contracts to Increase the Quality of Specific Types of Child Care
    • Programs to serve children with disabilities
    Not available
    • Programs to serve infants and toddlers
    Not available
    • Programs to serve school-age children
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children needing non-traditional hour care
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children experiencing homelessness
    Not available
    • Programs to serve children in underserved areas
    Not available
    • Programs that serve children with diverse linguistic or cultural backgrounds
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (urban)
    Not available
    • Programs that serve specific geographic areas (rural)
    Not available
    • Other:
    Described Below
    There are no descriptions needed.
    Base payment rates and percentiles
    Age Center Percentile of most recent MRS Family Child Care Percentile of most recent MRS
    Infant $ 65.43/ day N/A $ 50.46/ day N/A
    Toddler $ 65.43/ day N/A $ 50.46/ day N/A
    Preschool $ 48.87/ day N/A $ 30.84/ day N/A
    School Age $ 36.06/ day N/A $ 28.00/ day N/A
    Effective date of payment rates: 10/1/2018
    Market rate survey (MRS) date: 7/1/2018
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.3.1: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 4.2.5a: Setting Payment Rates. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Tiered Reimbursement or Differential Rates
    • Differential rate for non-traditional hours. Describe
    Yes
    • Differential rate for children with special needs, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Differential rate for infants and toddlers. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for infants/toddlers with no separate bonus or add-on
    Yes
    • Differential rate for school-age programs. Note: Do not check if the Lead Agency has a different base rate for school-age children with no separate bonus or add-on.
    Not available
    • Differential rate for higher quality, as defined by the state/territory.
    Yes
    • Other differential rates or tiered rates.
    Yes
    • Tiered or differential rates are not implemented.
    Not available
    CCDF Co-Payemts by Family Size
    CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size
    (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f)
    Family Size Lowest “Entry” Income Level Where Family Is First Charged Co-Pay (Greater Than $0) What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (a)? The Co-Payment in Column (b) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (a)? Highest “Entry” Income Level Before a Family Is No Longer Eligible What Is the Monthly Co-Payment for a Family of This Size Based on the Income Level in (d)? The Co-Payment in Column (e) is What Percentage of the Income in Column (d)?
    3 $22,462.00 $20.40 2 $51,050.00 $154.60 5
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.1a Family Size of 3: Family Contribution to Payment - CCDF Co-Payments by Family Size. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Family Contribution to Payment
    • No, the Lead Agency does not waive family contributions/co-payments.
    Not available
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families with an income at or below the Federal poverty level for families of the same size.
    Yes
    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services, as determined by the Lead Agency for purposes of CCDF eligibility. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation..
    Yes
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for families who are receiving or needing to receive protective services
    See response below. 

    • Yes, the Lead Agency waives family contributions/co-payments for other criteria established by the Lead Agency. Describe the policy and provide the policy citation
    Yes
    • Describe contributions/co-payments for other criteria (See table below)
    Described Below
    Applicants exempt from co-payment include: TANF recipients in countable activities other than employment; TANF payees in countable activities; TANF parent(s) or guardian(s) with physical or mental, disabilities; Unemployed parent(s) or guardian(s) receiving vocational rehabilitation services; Children receiving Child Protective Services; Children in foster care; Children experiencing homelessness; Teen or young adult parent(s) in junior and senior high school. Additionally, a family with a gross annual family income greater than one hundred percent (100%) but less than or equal to two hundred fifty percent (250%) of the FPL shall be required to pay the co-payment amount(s). In addition, adoptive parent(s) or guardian(s) (foster parent(s) who finalizes an adoption) are provided three (3) months with no co-payment from the effective date of adoption before beginning co-payments if payment requirement has been established.

    The District of Columbia Mayor's Order 2009-3, dated January 15, 2009 nunc pro tunc to August 16, 2009, designates OSSE as the lead agency for CCDF and delegated the authority of the Mayor to administer the District law that governs subsidized child care, D.C. Code § 4-401 et seq. The copay requirenments and exemptions are set forth in Section 400.1 of OSSE's Eligibility Determinations for Subsidized Child Care Policy Manual and 5-A DCMR §§ 204.2 and 204.3.
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 3.4.4: Family Contribution to Payment - Family Contribution to Payment. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Health and Safety

    Child-Staff Ratios by Group Size by Age of Children for Licensed Child Care Centers
    Age of Children Child-Staff Ratio Group Size
    Infant (11 months) 4:1 8
    Toddler (35 months) 4:1 8
    Preschool (59months) 8:1 16
    School-age (6 years) 15:1 30
    School-age (10 years and older) 15:1 30
    If any of the responses above are different for exempt child care centers, describe which requirements apply: Described Below
    The District does not exempt any child care centers.
    Source(s): National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance. (2021). 2020 Child Care Licensing Study: Analysis of child care licensing regulations. [Unpublished data].

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 5.2.1a-5_6_7: Standards on ratios, group sizes, and qualifications for CCDF providers.– exempt child care centers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Quality Improvement

    Use of Quality Funds
    Yes/No CCDF Funds Other Funds Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Yes Not available Yes Described Below
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Yes Not available Yes Described Below
    Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Supporting accreditation Yes Yes Not available Not available
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development Not available Not available Not available Not available
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Yes Yes Yes Described Below
    Use of Quality Funds - Continued
    Other (describe)
    Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce Local funds and federal grant funds from the Administration on Children and Families Early Head Start-Child Care Partnership grant.
    Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines Local Funds
    Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system Local funds
    Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers Local funds and federal grant funds from the Administration on Children and Families Early Head Start-Child Care Partnership grant.
    Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards Local funds
    Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territorys Local funds
    Supporting accreditation Not available
    Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development Not available
    Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible Local funds
    Source(s):
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Reports 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-1: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting the training and professional development of the child care workforce. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-2: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, maintaining, or implementing early learning and developmental guidelines. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-3: Use of Quality Funds - Developing, implementing, or enhancing a tiered quality rating and improvement system. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-4: Use of Quality Funds - Improving the supply and quality of child care services for infants and toddlers. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-5: Use of Quality Funds - Establishing or expanding a statewide system of CCR&R services. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-6: Use of Quality Funds - Facilitating compliance with state/territory requirements for inspection, monitoring, training, and health and safety standards. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-7: Use of Quality Funds - Evaluating and assessing the quality and effectiveness of child care services within the state/territory. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-8: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting accreditation. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-9: Use of Quality Funds - Supporting state/territory or local efforts to develop high-quality program standards relating to health, mental health, nutrition, physical activity, and physical development. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 7.2.1 and 7.2.1-10: Use of Quality Funds - Other activities determined by the state/territory to improve the quality of child care services and which measurement of outcomes related to improved provider preparedness, child safety, child well-being, or kindergarten entry is possible. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency
    Application in other languages (application document, brochures, provider notices) Yes
    Informational materials in non-English languages Yes
    Website in non-English languages Yes
    Lead Agency accepts applications at local community-based locations Yes
    Bilingual caseworkers or translators available Yes
    Bilingual outreach workers Yes
    Partnerships with community-based organizations Yes
    Other Not available
    Describe Other Not available
    Not available
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.1-1 and 2.1.1-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families for whom English is not their first language. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Outreach to Families with a Person(s) with Disabilities
    Applications and public informational materials available in Braille and other communication formats for access by individuals with disabilities Yes
    Websites that are accessible (e.g., Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act) Yes
    Caseworkers with specialized training/experience in working with individuals with disabilities Yes
    Ensuring accessibility of environments and activities for all children Yes
    Partnerships with state and local programs and associations focused on disability-related topics and issues Yes
    Partnerships with parent associations, support groups, and parent-to-parent support groups, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) federally funded Parent Training and Information Centers Yes
    Partnerships with state and local IDEA Part B, Section 619 and Part C providers and agencies Yes
    Availability and/or access to specialized services (e.g., mental health, behavioral specialists, therapists) to address the needs of all children Yes
    Other Not available
    Describe Other Not available
    Not available
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.1.2-1 and 2.1.2-2: Outreach to Families with Limited English Proficiency - Strategies the Lead Agency or partners utilize to provide outreach and services to eligible families with a person(s) with a disability. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.
    Consumer Education Website
    How the Lead Agency ensures that its website is consumer-friendly and easily accessible My Child Care DC is a consumer-friendly website that helps families find and compare child care options (http://childcareconnections.osse.dc.gov/). My Child Care DC allows families to search center-based and home-based child development providers by distance from a particular address or zip code and is accessible from mobile devices. Consumers can filter options by operating hours, type of facility, age range of students served and quality improvement ratings. The website also specifies which child development providers accept vouchers and participate in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). The website includes a detailed, easy-to-read provider profile that consists of inspection reports, capacity, licensing information, accreditation and substantiated complaints. The My Child Care DC is easily accessible in the OSSE, DC Child Care Connections and the Thrive by Five websites. Thrive by Five is a city-wide initiative acknowledging that learning begins at birth, every day counts and investments in early childhood education are essential. The Thrive by Five website provides information for families on health, development, early care and education, as well as information for providers.To ensure that the My Child Care DC website is consumer-friendly and easily accessible, OSSE used focus groups of parents to test the design and navigation of the site prior to launching. Furthermore, OSSE conducted a full self-assessment of the My Child Care DC website, based on the State and Territory Child Care Consumer Education Websites: Self-Assessment Checklist from the Administration for Child and Families (ACF). OSSE continues to monitor the usability of the website and identify needed enhancements to ensure  it remains consumer friendly and easily accessible.
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for families that speak languages other than English Effective Sept. 30, 2018, My Child Care DC will be available in all  languages outlined in Chapter 12 (Language Access Act) of Title 4 (Human Rights and Relations) of the District of Columbia Municipal Regulations (“DCMR”). Additionally families that speak langauges other than English and can access the website and can call (202) 829-2500 to receive free interpreter assistance. (http://childcareconnections.osse.dc.gov/MyChildCare/ContactUs).
    How the website ensures the widest possible access to services for persons with disabilities The Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) partners with the DC Child Care Connections (http://dcchildcareconnections.org/), a child care resource and referral agency that can assist parents and families, including persons with disabilities, with questions regarding child care in person, via email and telephone as appropriate. Additionally the Office of the Chief Technology office establishes the following guidelines for all District of Columbia websites.
    1) A text equivalent for every non-text element shall be provided. (images)
    2) Equivalent alternatives for any multimedia presentation shall be synchronized with the presentation. In other words, all videos, webinars, etc. must have subtitles or another way for deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals to access the content. (multimedia)
    3) When electronic forms are designed to be completed on-line, the form shall allow people using assistive technology to access the information, field elements, and functionality required for completion and submission of the form, including all directions and cues. (electronic forms)
    4) Row and column headers shall be identified for data tables. (tables)
    5) Markup shall be used to associate data cells and header cells for data tables that have two or more logical levels of row or column headers. (tables)
    6) Pages shall be designed to avoid causing the screen to flicker with a frequency greater than 2 Hz and lower than 55 Hz.
    7) When a web page requires that an applet, plug-in or other application be present on the client system to interpret page content, the page must provide a link to a plug-in or applet that complies with §1194.21(a) through (l).
    Accessibility Standards: Section 508 Compliance (page 30-33: https://octo.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/octo/publication/attachments/Drupal%207_FINAL%20120314.pdf
    Source(s): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2019). Report 2.3.1, 2.3.1, and 2.3.3: Consumer Education Website. ACF-118 Data Submission Center.

    Footnotes

    Click to show footnotes