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Brief

How States and Territories Can Plan to Recover

The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 requires Lead Agencies to develop state- and territory-wide child care disaster plans. These plans must demonstrate how each state and territory will address the needs of children—including the need for safe child care—before, during, and after a major disaster or emergency, including a state of emergency declared by the governor.

What Data are Needed to Support Planning, Response, and Recovery?

The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 requires Lead Agencies to develop statewide child care disaster plans. Each state’s plan must demonstrate how the state will address the needs of children—including the need for safe child care—before, during, and after a major disaster or emergency, including a state of emergency declared by the governor.

Continuation of Child Care Services: Louisiana's Experience

The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 requires Lead Agencies to develop state- and territory-wide child care disaster plans. These plans must demonstrate how each state and territory will address the needs of children—including the need for safe child care—before, during, and after a major disaster or emergency, including a state of emergency declared by the governor.

How States and Territories Prepare to Support Special Populations in Emergencies and Disasters

The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 requires Lead Agencies to develop state- and territory-wide child care disaster plans. These plans must demonstrate how each state and territory will address the needs of children—including the need for safe child care—before, during, and after a major disaster or emergency, including a state of emergency declared by the governor.

Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Recovery (EPRR) Discussion Brief Series

The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 requires Lead Agencies to develop state- and territory-wide child care disaster plans. These plans must demonstrate how each state and territory will address the needs of children—including the need for safe child care—before, during, and after a major disaster or emergency, including a state of emergency declared by the governor.

How do States and Territories Plan for and Respond to Hostile Intruder Incidents?

The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 requires Lead Agencies to develop state- and territory-wide child care disaster plans. These plans must demonstrate how each state and territory will address the needs of children—including the need for safe child care—before, during, and after a major disaster or emergency, including a state of emergency declared by the governor.

Staffed Family Child Care Networks: A Research-Informed Strategy for Supporting High-Quality Family Child Care

This brief includes a description of family child care networks and addresses supports a staffed family child care network can provide, particularly to special populations (family, friend, and neighbor care, license-exempt providers, English language learners, and dual language learners); the essential elements of an effective network; and the value networks bring to the family child care profession.

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Key Competencies for Licensors of Child Care Programs

A technical assistance resource document that outlines the knowledge, skills, abilities, behaviors, and other characteristics that a licensor of child care programs needs in order to perform his or her job duties successfully.
 
These key competencies for licensors was developed through job-task analysis with input from various state child care licensing programs, as well as a review of other professional competencies: 
  • Supporting child development
  • Caseload management 
  • Accountability

Developing and Revising Child Care Licensing Requirements

Having clearly written, research-based, measurable licensing requirements is the first step in protecting children from health and safety risks and promoting quality care. Licensing requirements—supported by monitoring, enforcement, and technical assistance—provide protection through prevention and reduce risks to the health, safety, and well-being of children in care. This document presents steps for developing and revising child care licensing requirements, based on several States’ successful practices.

Wait List vs. Enrollment Freeze

When the demand for child care assistance is greater than available funds, the State may need to manage enrollment in the child care subsidy program. This brief discusses two strategies States may use - creating a wait list of eligible participants, and freezing the eligibility or enrollment process. 

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